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Project hope

Christmas Project works because people take time to help

December 21, 2005

There’s hope in a hunger bag.

The familiar Rosauers food donation bags are just one part of the enormous community effort known as Hood River Christmas Project.

From a fashion show downtown to bulging boxes at the Hood River Valley High School cafeteria, many hands and hearts go into donating to, and funding, the Christmas Project.

News staff writer Christian Knight reports in rich detail on what went into this year’s food and toy drive, and about the long tradition of community-wide organized giving.

The project that dominates the lives of coordinators Bruce Holmson and Michelle Westfall, and a crew of other volunteers, for the last half of each year, comes wrapped in many forms, some of it in the simple brown grocery hunger bags that are purchased pre-filled and ready for delivery.

As described starting on page A1, the project has a long history. We believe it also has a bright future, but it requires the help of volunteers.

As the reporter states, “It’s a gargantuan event, loosely organized by dozens of people and consolidated by one charge: Give.”

The community owes a debt of gratitude to the dedicated volunteers who make the Christmas Project happen.

Like the food inside the Hunger Bags, their compassion is non-perishable.

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