‘Remembering the Year 1980’: Lloyd presents slide show of St. Helens

Local photographer Darryl Lloyd captured the eruption of Mount St. Helens during its second big eruption on May 25, 1980, from the south side of Mt. Adams at 7,800 feet. “The eruption started early in the morning and lasted until mid-day,” Lloyd said.

Darryl Lloyd
Local photographer Darryl Lloyd captured the eruption of Mount St. Helens during its second big eruption on May 25, 1980, from the south side of Mt. Adams at 7,800 feet. “The eruption started early in the morning and lasted until mid-day,” Lloyd said.



Local photographer Darryl Lloyd will present “Remembering the Year 1980” at Skamania Lodge in Stevenson on May 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The presentation is part of the Mount St. Helens Institute’s Volcanic Views and Brews Scenic Pub Lecture Series, which is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the mountain’s eruption.

The presentation is one of several located within the Portland/Vancouver area.

Lloyd will serve as host for the evening, showing about 50 slides that he took of Mount St. Helens over the course of several years.

“I’ve always had a very intense interest in Mount St. Helens, since I first climbed it at 11 years old,” Lloyd said. He went on to climb the mountain several times in the 1970s. The presentation begins with his time on the mountain as a child, then continues to some of his climbing expeditions before concentrating on photos he took in March 1980, when Mount St. Helens first started to erupt.

He flew around the mountain in a helicopter that April, taking photos of a landscape that, in just a month, would be completely changed.

“I got close ups of the big bulge coming out of the north side, of Spirt Lake covered with ice,” he said.

He knew that Mount St. Helens was erupting on May 18 when he saw Mt. Adams disappearing “in a huge dark ash cloud.” His first photos of that day were of Mt. Adams being enveloped; he then turned his lens to Mount St. Helens from a high point in Glenwood and spent the rest of the day photographing the eruption.

“Everyone had their own perspective of the eruption,” he said. “Afterward, I got photos of how the mountain changed when I backpacked across Mt. Adams a week later …”

The second big eruption happened that evening, May 25. “I got unique photos,” he said. “I was the only one to photograph that. Thick fog covered the low land of Western Washington, and airplanes were all grounded, and no one was on Mt. Adams. I got incredible photos.”

Later that summer, he flew again around Mount St. Helens, taking photos of “a completely transformed landscape around the mountain, especially on the north side.”

The community is invited to come and share their own memories of Mount St. Helens during the presentation, or just come and enjoy the program.

For more information, visit www.msinstitute.org.



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