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YESTERYEARS: Hottest August day ever recorded in 1977

August 13, 1937 — Heber Moore, the gentleman at the left with the wide grin, has a right to smile for last Sunday he won the 1937 Loomis House of Music golf tournament at the Country Club by defeating Bob Morrison, in the final match, 5 and 4. As a result of his victory, Moore will have his name engraved on the Loomis trophy which he is holding above. Morrison, who also upset a number of worth opponents in reaching the finals, is shown at right. HRN Photo-Engraving.

Hood River News archives
August 13, 1937 — Heber Moore, the gentleman at the left with the wide grin, has a right to smile for last Sunday he won the 1937 Loomis House of Music golf tournament at the Country Club by defeating Bob Morrison, in the final match, 5 and 4. As a result of his victory, Moore will have his name engraved on the Loomis trophy which he is holding above. Morrison, who also upset a number of worth opponents in reaching the finals, is shown at right. HRN Photo-Engraving.

1917 — 100 years ago

The school buildings and grounds are being put in shape for the opening of the city schools on Monday, Aug. 27. The high school course of study and the assignment of grades and teachers to the different buildings will be published next week. Examinations for grade pupils conditioned in certain subjects will be given Friday, Aug. 24 at 9:30 a.m.

1927 — 90 years ago

There are few residents of this section who can bring themselves to an appreciation of the long hot spell which has prevailed, almost without interruption for about three weeks. The exception was last Friday and Saturday morning, when the air was chilly. In past years, it has been the rule of a three-day hot spell to be followed by cool breezes from the west, but for several weeks past the east wind has prevailed or the air has been almost still. On Wednesday and Thursday, smoke from the big forest fires in Washington made the heat seem even more oppressive than the thermometer would indicate. In a number of orchards in the lower valley, considerable sun scald has occurred on the southwest side of the trees, especially those on which the foliage is not heavy and where heavy irrigation has not been resorted to.

1937 — 80 years ago

As another milestone towards completion of the Bonneville Dam project, the new Eagle Creek bridge and Tooth Rock tunnel was opened to traffic last Friday by highway officials. This opening will only be temporary, however, as the final coat of black top has not been laid and traffic will be turned back over the old route at a later date while that is done. State police are enforcing a 15-mile an hour speed limit over the new road and through the tunnel, due to loose gravel on the unfinished surface.

1947 — 70 years ago

Hood River Bottling Works (Squirt) softball team won the city league crown here Wednesday evening by annexing a second straight victory over the Legionnaires, this time by a squeaky 3-2 score. On Monday of this week, Squirt walloped Legion 19-2. Squirt will meet Rod Finney’s of The Dalles tomorrow in the first of the district playoff series.

VERBATIM: Zucchini Galore!

By MARY SISSON

Kaleidoscope Editor

Is my husband glad this paper is out! For three weeks the “What’s for dinner, dear?” has been “What kind of zucchini tonight?”

Not that there’s much cause to complain. With the 54 recipes printed on pages four and five, sent in by readers for a “Use Your Zucchini Contest,” the versatile vegetable offers enough variety to feed a family for weeks without ever repeating a dish. And zucchini can be the main dish, salad, bread, side dish, relish and dessert.

Zucchini itself sparks this creativity. When zucchinis ripen, they grow with amazing speed, and anyone with a zucchini plant or a friend with a zucchini plant knows of their abundance.

We’ve tried as many of the contest recipes as possible in the scope of a few weeks, and although four were named winners, we found each is a winner in its own way. Creativity, economy and how the recipe turned out in the testing were the basis for the awards.

No one produces down-home cooking like down-home cooks, and this sampling from the creative kitchens of Hood River News readers shows these cooks have met the zucchini challenge with flair.

— Hood River News, August 18, 1977

Apple Growers Association cannery, one of the most modern in this state, will start operations Tuesday of next week, Aug. 19, when Bartlett pears will be ready for processing. It is believed that hail damage has not been as extensive as was estimated after the unusual storm hit the lower Hood River Valley, and some of the damaged fruit is lending itself to salvage.

1957 — 60 years ago

Amid bawling cattle, hopeful contestants and bright colors, local residents and visitors watched the annual Hood River County Fair begin this week. FFA and 4-H youngsters vied for prizes in contests that kept judges busy all day Tuesday and Wednesday. In the school building at Wy’east, the classrooms were loaded with valley exhibitors, showing off their wares and talents. Everything from a cafeteria to the flower show could be seen in a tour through the building.

1967 — 50 years ago

Port of Hood River officials have made a step toward a new boat basin for the riverfront area. Mike McLucas, port manager, said his office had sent a letter to Mrs. Robert Vaughan indicating the agency would like to buy some riverfront property she owns east of the mouth of the Hood River and west of the Interstate Bridge. No figure was mentioned by McLucas, who said, “We’re bound by law to have three appraisers come up with a figure, if all parties approve of the sale.” Completion of the purchase would be a move toward a master plan being developed by the Port of Hood River. It calls for moving the present boat basin east to a new area where pilings are now in place.

1977 — 40 years ago

Mark Saturday, Aug. 13, 1977, down in your memory. It was the hottest August day ever recorded officially in Hood River. The 105 reading at the experiment station was a degree short of the all-time record of 106, but the higher temperature fell about a month earlier, on July 19.

A Lions club spokesman offered a swimming pool heating proposal to the city council Tuesday that might make Hood River unique in the country. Al Miles, whose solar heating activities have earned him widespread recognition, said the Lions want to cooperate in building a solar unit to heat the city swimming pool. Miles said it would save money and fuel, and it could make Hood River unique as a city with the first non-government subsidized solar heating unit for its municipal pool.

1987 — 30 years ago

“The weather was a big help.” Dick Jaarsma, an Oregon State Forestry spokesman, described the assistance provided by nature in controlling the spread of a fire which was reported about 4:30 p.m. Monday afternoon east of Miller Road, north of the community of Mt. Hood. West winds, which could have pushed the fire into heavy timber on the east wall of the upper valley, died after giving the blaze a good start, offering fire fighters the opportunity to control the fire at an estimated eight acres in size.

1997 — 20 years ago

With Bartlett pear harvest now underway in the lower Hood River Valley, it’s a good bet that the 1997 pear crop will put 1996 totals to shame, as growers and packers are expecting an average or better than average crop. The Bartlett pear harvest began in the valley’s lowest elevations this past weekend, about five days before the anticipated start. That probably means the estimated Aug. 30 beginning of the Anjou harvest — representing about two-thirds of the local pear crop total — is a bit too conservative as well, said Franz Niederholzer, Hood River’s Oregon State Extension agent. Apples are coming off valley fruit trees too: Early Golden Delicious were picked last week, Gravensteins are ripe now and Jonagolds are due at the end of August, Niederholzer said.

2007 — 10 years ago

Before the memory of the Frankton Road Fire fades away, fire officials want to use the occasion to education people on how to “fire-proof” their homes. The Aug. 4 fire scorched 37 acres, primarily within the city limits of Hood River. At one point, officials evacuated 100 homes. Although the fire threatened homes, it burned on undeveloped and privately-owned property. One unoccupied mobile home was destroyed. Before the burn, the area was densely covered in tall weeds, grass, blackberries, cottonwoods and scrub oak. While the askes from the recent fire have cooled and firefighters have done their final mop-up, their remains the potential for such a blaze to repeat.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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