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The Porch, Dec. 2 edition

DOES Santa even need a clock? If he ever did, for deliveries to Mississippi or elsewhere, he could start with this unique one hanging in Wally Ingram’s locksmith shop on the Heights.

Photo by Kirby Neumann-Rea
DOES Santa even need a clock? If he ever did, for deliveries to Mississippi or elsewhere, he could start with this unique one hanging in Wally Ingram’s locksmith shop on the Heights.



WELL SAID: “Don’t stumble over something behind you.” — Buster, the State and Ninth Street Bear

WELL DONE: Start Making A Reader Today volunteers reading books with youngsters, and those kids writing their names on book stickers on the eagerly-awaited “take home book day.” The acronym for the volunteer, community-funded program is SMART.

Volunteer readers are needed at all Hood River County School District facilities, except Parkdale, where no SMART program can happen until a volunteer coordinator and readers are found.

Want to help? Go to getSMARToregon.org or contact a coordinator at your school of choice, for example westside@getsmartoregon.org.

The good news is that the program is now starting at Parkdale Head Start, giving those youngsters two books to keep each month along with the time spent with books each week, which comes in addition to what they get in class or — if applicable — at home.

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In space at of May Street.

PLANETARY: The main May Street Elementary hallway is a linear space with a new depiction of, well, space: Teacher T. Dalbey’s Talented and Gifted students painted images of the planets of the solar system, including the central star, Helios, with Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, all proportionate in size to each other, and in approximate proportionate distance from the sun. All this and Pluto, too; the kids saw fit to include in the range that tiny object declared a “dwarf planet” in 2006 — the year some of these kids were born. Find the grape-sized dot in a corner, next to the west door.

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PLANES that brought food take off from Cascade Locks airfield.

CASCADE Locks’ airstrip, on Forest Lane, might not be unique, but how many such facilities exist that you can call a “neighborhood airfield”? Dozens of homes, and a church, are located adjacent to or across the street from it. Each week only one or two planes ever land at the short, “land-at-your-own-risk” strip. (One plane was seen parked there for a few weeks this fall.) Last week’s collaboration at the airfield between the FISH Food Bank in town and the Washington Pilots Association was a true (and unique) act of community service: four food-laden planes landed and trucks arrived with thousands more pounds of donated Thanksgiving food. It gave plenty of folks a far closer look than they had ever seen at the state-owned airfield in the middle of town; with that, an unexpected demonstration of just how safety-deprived is this orphan airfield: the fire department could not locate the key to unlock the vehicle gate, raising questions of access if, God forbid, a plane crash with injuries happened. Second, at the airfield entrance the small building that sheltered a public phone was taken out a couple of years ago, yet a pole next to the road still has a weathered blue “Phone” sign on it, but there is no phone present.

— Kirby Neumann-Rea



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