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YESTERYEARS: Postal Service breaks ground on new Odell distribution center in 2007

December 12, 1947 — A capacity crowd filled the Hood River High School auditorium last week for the presentation of “Northwest Neighbors,” the network radio show sponsored by Pacific Power and Light Company. The popular air show dramatized the life of Billy Sunday, famous Hood River evangelist, with Ed Lage of Hood River, a friend of Sunday, as a featured guest. In right foreground two radio actors dramatize a sketch from Sunday’s life. In grey suit at left is Johnny Carpenter, a famous sportscaster, who served as narrator. Standing behind piano at left is Art Kirkham, popular master of ceremonies. Ted Cooke, show producer, stands on stage at left with earphones. Sound engineer is at desk in front of the stage.

Hood River News archives
December 12, 1947 — A capacity crowd filled the Hood River High School auditorium last week for the presentation of “Northwest Neighbors,” the network radio show sponsored by Pacific Power and Light Company. The popular air show dramatized the life of Billy Sunday, famous Hood River evangelist, with Ed Lage of Hood River, a friend of Sunday, as a featured guest. In right foreground two radio actors dramatize a sketch from Sunday’s life. In grey suit at left is Johnny Carpenter, a famous sportscaster, who served as narrator. Standing behind piano at left is Art Kirkham, popular master of ceremonies. Ted Cooke, show producer, stands on stage at left with earphones. Sound engineer is at desk in front of the stage.



1917 — 100 years ago

I have sold my meatmarket and grocery store to L.H. Huggins, who took possession Friday, Dec. 7. All bills contracted before that date are payable to me at my office next door to the meatmarket. All those owing me please call or notify me and I will call on you. — E.M. Holman, phone 3392.

1927 — 90 years ago

Pine Grove Grangers enjoyed the very pleasurable sensation on Wednesday night of this week of watching a mortgage, which has been on their grange hall for the past 22 years, shrivel into ashes in a cauldron of blazing coals. The ceremony drew a big crowd, including Grangers from other parts of the valley.

VERBATIM: City Decides To Give Easements

City Wants Record Of Columbia Boulevard Cleared For Federal Participation In Work

Memories of former days, when residents of Hood River used to travel by way of the Columbia boulevard to the old boat landing, were revived on Monday evening, when Hood River’s county court requested the city fathers to give an easement to any rights of way which the city of Hood River once held in the now forgotten boulevard.

In the distant days when river steamers were common on the Columbia, the city maintained some semblance of rights of way along the Columbia boulevard, which extended form the city limits to the boat landing, west of Koberg beach. Over a period of years, the city annually did some maintenance work on the road, before its authority lapsed when visits of river steamboats ended.

For a number of more recent years, the county court has undertaken to maintain this road, first to the ferry landing and later to the interstate bridge. Now the federal government is putting up the money for the building of a levee and new highway to the bridge and has asked the county to secure title to all rights of way, formerly held by the city of Hood River.

Monday, the council decided that the easements to any interests the city had in the property would be given to the county court.

— Hood River News, December 10, 1937

With the approach of Christmas, local Elks are preparing to play the part of big brothers to local children, especially those whose parents, though force of circumstances, are unable to carry to the children the real meaning of Christmas. Not only will the children be provided for, but every poor family in both city and valley will enjoy a real Christmas dinner if the Elks have their way.

1937 — 80 years ago

Observing their annual plan of furnishing decoration for the business sections of Hood River, the local post of the American Legion made a trip into the hills Sunday and, in spite of the damp conditions, brought back a bountiful supply of Christmas trees and on Monday, the downtown and hill sections were a real reminder that Christmas is at hand. For several blocks downtown, cedar fronds and colored lights have been woven into ropes, which were strung between the ornamental lighting posts. These, together with the interior decorations and illuminations, made the town most attractive to residents and visitors.

1947 — 70 years ago

During the early hours of Thursday morning, beavers felled a tree about half mile north of Springer’s Mt. Hood store and, in falling, the tree severed the Pacific Power and Light Company’s main line to the upper valley. Repairs were effected and service was resumed at about 8:30 yesterday morning.

A Parkdale delegation has expressed its concern about the heavy cutting of Christmas trees in the Red Hill district of the Upper Valley. Residents of the area state that evidence indicated that the trees were being cut on a commercial basis on Forest lands, county areas and on privately-owned land.

1957 — 60 years ago

More than 130 small but lively admires of Wyatt Earp were out of their saddles Tuesday night as Odell grade school children gave up treasured TV viewing time to participate in a blood-typing clinic in the grade school gymnasium. It is believed to be the first such program in the State of Oregon. The clinic, sponsored by the Odell grade school PTL in the interest of civil defense, was conducted by Rex Walker, chief laboratory technician from Hood River Memorial Hospital. The blood typing will supply vital information to be stamped on metal identification tags, to be made available to the children at a small cost. Odell grade school, as far as it is known, is the first public school in the state to undertake this program.

1967 — 50 years ago

A shop building on the Hood River Valley’s east side will soon house a homegrown industry representing a new idea for the community. The industry is a sheltered workshop, which will be designed to provide jobs for handicapped persons. “We’re going to start out with four or five people,” said Lile Dudley, who is the director of the project. Civic leaders have arranged to house their project in a former machine shop building in Pine Grove owned by Mrs. Audrey Tonn. A benefit concert last Sunday provided about $400 to help the project get started, and the Shelter Workshop has been collecting funds from other donations.

1977 — 40 years ago

A Thanksgiving snow faded from peoples’ minds when floods enveloped the area the first week in December. Once again this week, torrents of rain fell on the valley, and flooding followed. On Monday and Tuesday of this week, four inches fell in Hood River and five in Parkdale. As of Wednesday, Dec. 14, two county roads were closed indefinitely — Toll Bridge Road, east of Parkdale, and Woodworth Road, north of Parkdale. Both approaches to the road were washed out.

1987 — 30 years ago

A bequest in a local estate has provided a foundation for plans to launch a building expansion fund at the Hood River County Museum, according to Bob Kirtley, vice chairman of the museum board. “The museum is full to overflowing, and there are many items in storage,” he said. “We’ve known for some time that we needed to add on to the museum.” Recent receipt of almost $2,000 from an estate development, to be administered by the Hood River County Historical Society, were placed in a special interest-bearing account, the initial investment for building a new wing on the museum, which is located at the Port of Hood River Marina site.

1997 — 20 years ago

Act III Theaters, which had proposed a six-plex cinema near Walmart, now has its eye on the Port of Hood River waterfront. The national cinema chain is negotiating with port officials to build its theater on land adjoining the proposed Hood RiverFront complex conference center. But another player has entered the picture — Andrew’s Pizza and Skylight Theater owner Andrew McElderry, who wants to open his own theater on the port site. The port hasn’t made a decision on either proposal.

2007 — 10 years ago

Groundwork has already begun in Odell on the new distribution center for the Hood River Post Office. Postmaster Kevin Branson said carrier routes and distribution work will switch to the new facility, but the retail counter will remain open at the downtown Hood River location. The facility won’t replace the Odell Post Office either, because it will be solely for internal use and have no commercial counter.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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