Yesteryears: Plans underway to make Hood River a tourist destination in 1947

March 23, 1967 — Thirty foreign students on spring vacation from the University of Oregon prepare to board a bus after spending an evening in Hood River County homes Monday. Burton Bradley, holding the box of fruit, made sure they didn’t go away empty-handed Tuesday morning. The box of apples he sent with the students was donated by the Rotary club. Next stop on the students’ tour was to be The Dalles. They were to swing through Central Oregon, then back to Eugene for spring term studies.

Hood River News archives
March 23, 1967 — Thirty foreign students on spring vacation from the University of Oregon prepare to board a bus after spending an evening in Hood River County homes Monday. Burton Bradley, holding the box of fruit, made sure they didn’t go away empty-handed Tuesday morning. The box of apples he sent with the students was donated by the Rotary club. Next stop on the students’ tour was to be The Dalles. They were to swing through Central Oregon, then back to Eugene for spring term studies.



1917 — 100 years ago

A proposition to dissolve the Hood River Apple Growers Union as a corporation and sell all of its property to the Apple Growers Association will be considered at the annual meeting of the stock holders of the Apple Growers Union Saturday, April 7. Since the consolidation of local interests in the Association, the Apple Growers Union has performed a nominal function only. It is now felt that the time is right to affect an actual consolidation with the Association, which, under the proposed plan, maybe be done to the advantage of all parties concerned.

1927 — 90 years ago

Even if there are no more additions to the program of contemplated service stations, there should be sufficient to supply visitors and the residents at least for a few months. R.L. Bartol has acquired the service station on the corner of Second and Cascade and his first improvement was a new concrete approach from both streets. Work on the Sparks service station, corner of Front and State, is being rushed and the station will be ready in time for tourist business. The Cascade Garage and the Head Exchange have been newly painted and decorated. On the Heights, C.A. Frey is now building a big service station on the corner of 12th and May streets, and the Mooney’s are building another on the site of the old baseball park. This station will be leased by one of the Schindler brothers.

VERBATIM: Growers To Have Bee Protection

State Agricultural Department Will End Empty Hive Racket By Close Inspection

If plans to be enforced by the State Department of Agriculture go through as expected, fruit growers of this state, who pay for the pollination services of a stand of bees, from now on will have some assurance that each stand will contain several pounds of active bees, instead of anything from 25 to 100 bees, as occurred this season, when depopulated stands were brought to this county and passed off as normal stands at $2.50 to $3 per stand for the few days they were left among the blossoming trees.

Under the new apiarist law, according to Frank McKennon, chief of the division of plant industry, an appropriation of $2,500 for the biennium was made by the legislature to enforce the new law, and a fulltime inspector will train men in various localities to recognize disease forms.

Further, the 2,500 bee keepers in this state must be registered and the 43,750 hives must be inspected, if the bees are sold or moved. The new law, which raises the fees to a minimum of $1 and a maximum of $20, with a charge for 10 cents a hive for all over 10 hives, does not go into effect for a whole year, so there is plenty of time for apiarists to secure registration certificates at the lower rate.

The state department will cooperate with apiarists and fruit men in certifying the strength of colonies used in orchards for pollination work.

— Hood River News, March 26, 1937

1937 — 80 years ago

While seated at his desk on the second floor of the Paris Fair Monday afternoon, M.C. McCarty heard a thud and, before he could turn, was showered with glass. Fortunately, he was not injured. An investigation revealed that a car had been parked on Fourth Street and, when the breaks had loosened, mounted the curb on trash brought down by Saturday’s rains, crossed the sidewalk and smashed in the barred window on level with the office of the Paris Fair. A shallow curb at several spots on Fourth between Oak and State has involved a number of parked cars in trouble, several having crashed through the fence at the rear of Paris Fair.

1947 — 70 years ago

An outline of the reasons why Hood River County should sponsor a Tourist Host school of information on the tourist business and its importance to both county and the state was presented to the Tourist Committee of the Chamber of Commerce Tuesday by Hal Powell and O.E. Palmateer, representatives of the Tourist Promotion Committee of the Oregon Advertising Club of Portland. It was pointed out that everyone is after the tourist business because it is a big business. In fact, 43 states spent $7 million in advertising to develop tourist business in 1946. Hood River County is concerned with getting as much out of state tourists in this area as it possibly can. An objective must also be to keep those tourists in our area for the longest possible time — and then make an additional effort to keep them in the state of Oregon as long as it is practical.

1957 — 60 years ago

Mosier Christian Church will observe its 58th anniversary on Sunday starting with Sunday school. A basket dinner starts at 1:30 p.m. and an anniversary service follows. Rev. Harry Atkins of Dufur is the speaker. Rev. W.J. Jenkins was the church’s minster when it was organized March 27, 1899. No charter members reside in Mosier, but it is thought that one lives on the Oregon coast.

The Pine Grove Grange Hall served as the longhouse meeting place of Wyam Chief Tommy Kuni Thompson and 15 Columbia River Indian guests during the Sunday afternoon meeting of the Hood River County Historical Society. Flora Thompson, wife of the 103-year-old chief, said she hopes that the white man and Indian will not forget one another.

1967 — 50 years ago

Safeway Store Manager Paul Sanstrum rang up $100 in sales on a store cash register last Thursday, and not a bit of merchandise left the store with the sales slip. The money was an unexpected payment from an anonymous person (with a conscience) who had apparently shoplifted groceries over a period of time, then decided to make it right. The payment came in the form of a $100 money order with a note from the sender and carried a Salem postmark and address. “There’s no question, it’s good to get the money,” said Sanstrum. But he couldn’t help scratching his head, a little perplexed, over the disappearance of $100 in groceries via “the back door.”

1977 — 40 years ago

Basic bids for a new little theater were somewhat above the budget, but school board members wrestled with a list of alternatives and came up with the right formula last week. Finally they awarded the bid to a Tigard company for $593,122 after four qualifying bids were opened March 23. The 19 alternatives included items that could be added or deleted, and the board went over this list carefully before coming up with the final figures.

1987 — 30 years ago

Prospects for resuming operations at a Dee hardboard plant early in the summer were revealed Monday by leaders of a group negotiating to purchase the operation. A press conference Monday ended with an affirmative answer on speculation that a private group was considering the acquisition. “The plant, which has been closed for the past two years, will be recommissioned immediately,” stated a press release. “Commercial production is expected to recommence early this summer.”

1997 — 20 years ago

Property owners and developers will have a brief window of opportunity to seek construction approval before new restrictions take effect on the city’s industrial-zoned lands. The Hood River City Council on Monday unanimously approved amendments to the city zoning code that severely restrict new commercial development on industrial and light-industrial property. The restriction was part of a series of amendments recommended by the city planning commission. The commercial-industrial rule will only allow those commercial uses that are “incidental and essential” to an attached industrial use, such as a retail outlet for a manufacturing facility. The council, however, included a provision that delays the effective date of the amendment as much as six months.

2007 — 10 years ago

A national honor goes to a Hood River messenger of hope. Maria Antonia (Toña) Sánchez of Hood River is one of 25 Yoplait Champions — ordinary women and men doing extraordinary things in their local communities to help in the fight against breast cancer. Sanchez works with Hispanic women who have breast cancer in the Mesanjeras de Esperanza (Messengers of Hope) program through Nuestra Communidad Sana, which is part of The Next Door, Inc., social services agency.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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