YESTERYEARS: R.J. McIsaac planning Parkdale store, service station in 1937

May 16, 1957 — Blueprints of Memorial Hospital’s new $525,000 addition are reviewed by these officials pictured in front of the present structure and on the site where the new facilities will be built. Construction started this week. Pictured from left are: Judge Arvo Hukari, building member chairman; Percy Bucklin, general fund chairman; W.J. Wilcox, clerk of the works; George Jubitz, secretary of the board; E.R. “Ted” Pooley, trustee president; and Glenn Howell, hospital administrator.

Hood River News archives
May 16, 1957 — Blueprints of Memorial Hospital’s new $525,000 addition are reviewed by these officials pictured in front of the present structure and on the site where the new facilities will be built. Construction started this week. Pictured from left are: Judge Arvo Hukari, building member chairman; Percy Bucklin, general fund chairman; W.J. Wilcox, clerk of the works; George Jubitz, secretary of the board; E.R. “Ted” Pooley, trustee president; and Glenn Howell, hospital administrator.



1917 — 100 years ago

In order to get the main country roads repaired before the heavy travel of the summer and fall months, the county court is employing three big trucks in addition to the one owned by the county. It has been determined that the trucks move the gravel for about half what it costs by team. One of them is working on the West Side, one on the East Side and the third in the upper valley. It is planned to keep them busy for about a month when the main thoroughfares of the county will have been placed in excellent condition.

VERBATIM: Strawberry Crop Looks Like Bumper

If the blossoms count for anything — and they did not in many of the pear orchards — then strawberry growers should be able to report a bumper crop this year. Abundant moisture the past winter and with the soil near saturation when the plants began to grow this spring, proved very beneficial to the plants which have not only made an unusually good growth but are carrying a remarkable set of blossoms.

T.H. Markley reports that one of his plants carries 197 blossoms, and Mr. Vannier and a number of other strawberry growers state that they have many plants which will average from 150 to 175 blossoms. This is the first winter in several years which was preceded by an abundance of moisture in the fall, and in which heavy snow was followed by sufficient rain in the early spring to keep the moisture level up to the surface. If this is responsible for the condition of the strawberry plants this spring, it ought to furnish an argument for late and early irrigation of strawberry patches.

— Hood River News, May 20, 1927

1927 — 90 years ago

Members of the Lunch Club of the chamber of commerce on Tuesday at the Waukoma (sic) hotel listened to an interesting talk on the Community Hospital and some of the plans for the new building which, it is believed, will in the not distant future take the place of the present hospital.

As already reported in last week’s News, construction of the new Cloud Cap Inn and the development of the project for a first-class summer resort on the north side of Mount Hood will be undertaken this year as soon as the snows have melted sufficiently to permit operations to be started.

1937 — 80 years ago

There’s going to be a building boom in Parkdale in the near future, according to word reaching the News’ office this week. R.J. McIsaac is planning to build a store and service station on the corner lot, now occupied by the implement shed, and an attendant will be stationed in the new store. This will eliminate the trouble of getting to the gasoline pumps when a crowd is at the store. Ed. Krieg of Hood River will handle the job. Another building planned for the near future is a theater, which Jack Sigler is to build on the lot east of the Grange hall at Parkdale. All preliminaries for the purchase of the ground have been completed, and soon there will be “the sound of hammers, blow on blow.”

1947 — 70 years ago

Memorial poppies will be worn here on Poppy Day, May 24, in honor of the dead of both world wars, stated Mrs. Emily Scott, Poppy chairman of the Hood River unit of the American Legion Auxiliary. “The poppies are crepe paper replicas of the wild poppies which grew in France and Belgium, where so many of the battles of both wars were fought,” explains Mrs. Scott. “They are the poppies which grew ‘between the crosses, row on row,’ in the World War I battle cemeteries and so became the memorial flower for the war dead. Now they symbolize memory for those who died for America on land, sea and in the air in every part of the world. Each flower is made entirely by hand by a disabled veteran.”

1957 — 60 years ago

Yasui Boy Wins Disneyland Trip — An all-expense trip to Disneyland is the prize won by Phillip Yasui of Odell for selling the greatest number of tickets to the Boy Scout-Cub Scout Craft show, recently held in Portland. Phillip, who sold 282 tickets, competed with 18,000 other scouts. Phillip and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ray T. Yasui, are eligible to take the trip. He is a member of Cub Scout Pack 378.

1967 — 50 years ago

Two buildings, one for livestock and the other for exhibits, are being considered for construction this year at Hood River County’s newly developed fairgrounds property. Harold Isaak, fair board chairman, said plans were still tentative this week concerning the construction program, but he contended that there are “definitely plans for some building this year.”

Elmer Owen Chevrolet-Oldsmobile will join the growing Tucker Road business community late this summer when construction of a new building is completed. Owen said the auto dealership will go in to the north of Ben Franklin in the Hood River Shopping Center. Owen becomes the third business in the shopping center that started last summer.

1977 — 40 years ago

A proposed 11-lot subdivision along Davis Drive in Odell ran into a major obstacle Monday when Hood River County Commissioners denied a request for a comprehensive plan change from residential farm to medium density residential. The board denied the request on the grounds petitioner Vernon Weberg failed to prove need.

Hood River City Council members showed up Tuesday night at the county budget meeting to request over $150,000 for road improvements. It has not been included in the county proposed budget, which is now being formed. “The 12th and 13th streets proposed one-way couplet is a number one priority project in both the city and the community,” said Hood River Mayor Chuck Beardsley to the budget committee.

1987 — 30 years ago

Hood River has ample reason to celebrate this week — Waucoma Center has been selected as the long-term headquarters for the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area. Office space has also been reserved for the scenic area’s bi-state commission, should it chose to locate in Waucoma. It’s a major plum for the eye-catching facility — a space that evolved from a dingy, deserted concrete cold-storage building via vision, daring and dollars supplied by the port and its commission.

Early May’s unusually warm temperatures vanished this week with the arrival of an upper atmosphere low pressure area over the Northwest. The new weather pattern sent temperatures plunging and strong west winds racing through the Columbia Gorge. Boardsailers were quick to take advantage of the change — and head to the river.

1997 — 20 years ago

Paving is expected to begin today, May 14, as the Second Street Improvement Project heads into its final stages. The revised schedule has the $1 million project being wrapped up by the Memorial Day weekend, beginning May 24. In the meantime, downtown drivers and pedestrians can expect some more disruptions. The Oak Avenue-Second Street intersection will be closed for several days as the concrete walkways on Second are set. Paving is expected to take just a day or two.

2007 — 10 years ago

Campers will be able to enjoy an onsite shower this summer at the Port of Cascade Locks campground. Special Projects Director Nick Kraemer reported May 3 to the commissioners that the long-awaited panels for a new campground restroom and shower facility have finally arrived. “We’re still working on utilities, but we are definitely on schedule,” Kraemer said. The port had faced months of delays when it was found that the first vendor could not deliver because the structure was wider than the underpass entryway to the site. Kraemer searched for another vendor and found a company that made a similar product but with panels that could be assembled led after delivery.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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