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YESTERYEARS: Snow closes I-84 to traffic in 1977

November 29, 1997 — Dispatch trainee Eva Belt of Cascade Locks learns the ropes at county 9-1-1 center. An EMT for Cascade Locks Fire Department, Belt said she is interested in “getting into a different aspect of the people-helping business.” The county sheriff’s office hopes to bring a new 9-1-1 dispatch center in May or June. Photo by Thomas Bennett.

Hood River News archives
November 29, 1997 — Dispatch trainee Eva Belt of Cascade Locks learns the ropes at county 9-1-1 center. An EMT for Cascade Locks Fire Department, Belt said she is interested in “getting into a different aspect of the people-helping business.” The county sheriff’s office hopes to bring a new 9-1-1 dispatch center in May or June. Photo by Thomas Bennett.



1917 — 100 years ago

If you want to be a volunteer, now is the time to enlist. After Dec. 15, when the new draft regulations become effective, men of draft age will not be permitted to enlist voluntarily in the Army, Navy or Marine Corps.

Sales of sugar to family consumers is limited to $1 purchases. Hotels, restaurants and boarding houses are limited to a 10-day supply.

1927 — 90 years ago

Derailment of several cars of freight train 256, between Bonneville and Cascade Locks last Sunday, caused several hours delay to trains, and several local people who were in Portland over the weekend were late in arriving home. The accident was caused by weakened tracks, which has been undermined during the recent unusually heavy rains. The damage to the cars and track were very small. Traffic was resumed on full schedule on Monday.

VERBATIM: Youth Fireman Program Slated

By the end of this school year, students between 16 and 18 may be eligible to be voluntary firemen after the city council adopted a request from the fire department to institute a student trainee program in the Hood River Fire Department at its regular meeting on Nov. 22.

Before the program actually begins operations, the bylaws of the department will have to be changed, which Fire Chief Leonard Hay says might be done within the next three months. “But, if it’s operational by the end of this school year, we’ll be lucky,” Hay says. “But, I hope it does start by the tail end of the year, so they can work in the department through the summer also.”

Eight students will be accepted in to the program, two from each company. These trainees will receive credit toward gradation with grades sent to the school at the end of each nine weeks. In order to be admitted, parental permission is required. The trainees won’t be allowed into a blazing building or vote in department business.

Hay adds that he believes the program has been a proved success in Odell, West Side and Parkdale fire departments.

— Hood River News, Dec. 1, 1977

1937 — 80 years ago

Hood River, which somebody, a few years ago, defined as a quiet mountain stream, went on the rampage Monday night, following prolonged rains, and what it did to the levee which is to protect the Mt. Hood Railroad brought suitable comment Tuesday morning from superintendent of the Kern & Kibee, contractors who have this project in hand. When the contractors brought equipment here a month ago, Hood River was on its best behavior and gave no indication that, on occasion, it has been known to go on real and costly rampages. To offset any normal rise in the stream, the contractors used a power shovel to cut a new river bed to divert much of the current away from the railroad embankment. Then came the prolonged rains and, sometime late Monday night, Hood River rose several feet, decided to return to its old channel and cut away sections of rock work. The full extent of the damage will not be evident until the water recedes.

1947 — 70 years ago

The Upper Hood River Valley is now near realization of its ambition to have a new, modern auditorium, one of the best of its type in upstate Oregon, and leaders who have played prominent parts in bringing this project so near to completion are now asking for about $5,000 to put the finishing touches to the fine building.

A total number of 1,921 residents of this county set up a new record when they submitted to T.B. tests when the mobile unit was here last week. Much interest was displayed in both town and county centers, as the following figures reveal: Parkdale, 336; Odell, 296; Cascade Locks, 258; City of Hood River, 1,031.

1957 — 60 years ago

Leaving no stone unturned to make Santa Claus feel at home when he arrives here today, the 29th, the Chamber of Commerce merchants’ committee spent last weekend bedecking city streets with traditional yuletide garb. Working from trucks provided by local organizations, the volunteer workmen finished the yule decorations by Monday. Most useful seemed to be the new hydraulic-operated ladder truck loaned by the Oregon-Washington Telephone Co. With Marvin Harder perched precariously on the business end, the ladder made the light pols easily accessible for the festive work.

1967 — 50 years ago

Hood River’s newest grocery store, Keil’s Food Stores, starts its grand opening this week. It’s not a new store — lots of groceries have been sold at the Tucker Road location the past six years — but extensive remodeling work almost makes it appear to be a new building. New owner Ron Keil has directed a nearly compete face-lifting job on the inside with the construction of handsome curtain drops around the interior of the store to set off the meat, produce and other departments. Outside, a complete paint job has been combined with a new canopy front to give the store a completely different and more modern appearance.

1977 — 40 years ago

For hundreds of motorists, Thanksgiving Eve of 1977 and Hood River will be frozen solidly together in their memories. It was the night many of them spent in their cars on a freeway, waiting for state and local officers to allow them to head west through the perilous Columbia River Gorge. Others packed motels and restaurants in Hood River to wait out a closure established early in the evening by state police. Many eastbound motorists on the freeway were stranded up to five hours in the section between Troutdale and Cascade Locks. Snow was at the root of the problem, and heavy holiday traffic on I-80N didn’t mix in well with the snow. The result was jackknifed truck trailers, dozens of vehicle pileups between Hood River and Troutdale, and long delays for clearing traffic.

1987 — 30 years ago

A Multnomah County corrections facility proposed for the Wyeth area is raising hackles throughout Hood River County, but proponents say the plan is a sound one that will benefit criminals and county alike. Multnomah County Corrections wants to expand an existing Forest Service work camp located a mile off the freeway at Wyeth. The property is owned by the Forest Service, following its recent transfer from the San Francisco-based Trust for Public Lands. Before that the land was privately owned. The “Forest Service” project camp would support up to 30 prisoners who choose to serve out their sentences through community service work instead of jail time.

1997 — 20 years ago

A series of snowstorms last week did exactly what Mt. Hood Meadows’ officials hoped for — provide enough snow for a pre-holiday opening. Meadows officially announced its opening for the 1997-1998 season on Monday, thanks to nearly two and a half feet of snow dumped on the mountain last week, and more could be on the way, said Dave Riley, vice president and general manager.

2007 — 10 years ago

From ski level to sea level, snow will be on people’s minds this weekend. Skiers in the Gorge may relish the 40 inches of new snow on the slopes of Mount Hood and the opening of two upper chairlifts this week at Mt. Hood Meadows, but the white stuff is also predicted to collect on the Hood River Valley floor Saturday and Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. The service issued a storm warning for all of northwest Oregon and southwest Washington Friday morning. Snow is expected in the Willamette Valley and nearly every western Oregon and Columbia Gorge community.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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