Yesteryears: Huckleberry season in 1958

Hood River News: August 3, 1978: The slogan on his t-shirt identifies him as a “Bionic Baby,” but by the time the county fair was wearing on, Ryan Beam’s batteries were wearing out Saturday. The youngster, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Beam of Hood River, had had all the county fair sights and sounds he needed for one day and was perfectly comfortable to collapse in his carriage and let the old folks push him wherever they pleased. He’d had his excitement for the day. There was no potion needed to create this mood except for the excitement of carnival, sounds and crowds that can wear a young man down in short order.

Hood River News archives
Hood River News: August 3, 1978: The slogan on his t-shirt identifies him as a “Bionic Baby,” but by the time the county fair was wearing on, Ryan Beam’s batteries were wearing out Saturday. The youngster, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Beam of Hood River, had had all the county fair sights and sounds he needed for one day and was perfectly comfortable to collapse in his carriage and let the old folks push him wherever they pleased. He’d had his excitement for the day. There was no potion needed to create this mood except for the excitement of carnival, sounds and crowds that can wear a young man down in short order.



1918 — 100 years ago

Principals and superintendents of schools attending the summer season of the University of Oregon are sending out a letter to the school boards of the state urging that some member of the high school faculty or the city superintendent be delegated by the board to attend the August military training camp at the university.

The letter, written at the unanimous request of a largely attended meeting, points out, in explanation of its request, that “next year will be a war year. The schools will be an increasing agency for efficient organization of the community forces. Military training will be desired next year by many of the high schools; militia companies will be wanting leaders and drillmasters.”

Verbatim: Aurora Borealis Viewed By Many

One of the most extensive displays of the Northern Lights seen here in several years opened around 9 o’clock Friday night of last week, and continued until the dawn on Saturday morning caused the phenomena to fade out.

The entire northern horizon was brightly illuminated with a curtain of light, while, from time to time, light rays, reaching like huge searchlights from horizon to zenith, moved slowly to and fro.

So strong was the curtain of light that Mount Adams stood out black and strong, and trees on the summits of intervening hills were silhouetted against the background of light.

At a rough guess, several who noticed the shafts of light reaching high into the sky thought they might be beams from the searchlights of warships in Portland harbor.

Just want the display portends, the Aurora Borealis is one natural phenomenon which scientists agree they know nothing.

— Hood River News, August 5, 1938

1928 — 90 years ago

The necessity of more space to take care of the needs of an ever-increasing business, and a desire to make theirs one of the most up-to-date electrical stores in this district, were given as reasons by Manager Walter Colby, of the Apple City Electric Shop, for taking over for their own use the space formerly occupied by Laraway’s jewelry store. That company has just sold all of its jewelry supplies and has gone out of business. Mr. Colby took over all the showcases and wall cabinets and will use them for the display of electrical goods. Besides a complete line of general electrical supplies, they will handle the Majestic radio, Westinghouse ranges and Easy Washing machines.

1938 — 80 years ago

Authorization to complete application for 100 kilowatt years of Bonneville power was given Mayor Kolstad and Recorder Howe at the regular meeting of the city council, held on Monday. The power, according to members of the council, will be used for municipal purposes only and will provide nearly twice as much current for the city’s street-lighting system at a rate closely approximating the present cost. Present figures indicate that the exact cost would be but $40 a year more than at the present time. Under the approved plan, the present municipal plant will be shut down but will be available for emergencies or extra demand.

1948 — 70 years ago

Five pumping trucks from fire control districts in the Mount Hood forest and 15 forest service men joined a party of 45 firefighters in bringing a 500-acre fire under control between Pine Creek and Little Badger Creek on the southeast edge of the Mt. Hood National Forest on Wednesday. Around 50 acres of wheat were also consumed in the fire, which was believed to have been caused by careless fishermen. Trucks from lumber mills at Tygh Valley and Dufur, as well as busses, were used in transporting the volunteer firefighters from Maupin, Wamic, Tygh Valley and Dufur.

1958 — 60 years ago

The Mt. Hood National Forest reports that due to the warm weather, this year’s crop of huckleberries is how ready for harvest in the lower elevated sunny areas. The peak of the crop, however, should be between August 1 and 15.

John J. Nelson, Portland, has purchased the Hood River Sand, Gravel and Ready-Mix Co., it was announced this week. Mr. Nelson plans to move into the John R. Douglas quarters on the plant site soon. Mr. Douglas is the former owner of the concrete plant. In the purchase, Mr. Nelson acquires the Hood River Plant, plus the plant and 33 acres of land in Cascade Locks belonging to the firm.

1968 — 50 years ago

Bids for adding a second story to the Mid-Columbia Experiment Station south of Hood River has been called by the Oregon State Board of Higher Education. Contractors have until Aug. 20 to turn in bids. Plans call for adding a large room at the upper level and three rooms below to the present main office and laboratory building.

A spokesman at the agricultural station said present space had become overcrowded as additional projects were undertaken.

1978 — 40 years ago

An ever-changing Hood River County Fair completed another successful year Saturday, and it may be the last of its kind here. At least, if building plans being unveiled next week get the needed backing, this will be the case. On Thursday, the County Fair Board will review architect plans for a major central facility for the fairgrounds, a structure which would complete the long-range planning for the area. Tentatively, the structure would serve not only as housing for the open classes, which are now in the Wy’east school building, but it would be a year-round center for community activities.

1988 — 30 years ago

More than 300 firefighters descended on a remote location three miles southwest of Lost Lake last weekend as a fire that started late Saturday burned an estimated 85 acres. Strong west winds fanned the blaze, which sent a huge plume of smoke over the Upper Hood River Valley Sunday morning. By Monday morning, crews had placed firebreaks around 95 percent of the area involved. The “Laurel Fire” started in or close to a year-old logging unit near Laurel Creek. Timber had been felled and bucked on the unit last year, but no logging operations have occurred.

1998 — 20 years ago

Powerdale Dam, the 80-year-old hydroelectric facility on the lower Hood River, should escape the controversy that has surrounded another local dam. Powerdale is up for re-licensing from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which oversees the operations of such facilities. At least one local official says the company has done a great deal to address the agencies’ concerns about fish passage, stream flows and other fisheries-related issues.

Condit Dam, located on the White Salmon River, was the source of heated debate three years ago.

2008 — 10 years ago

Advocates for the Historic Columbia River Highway have an ambitious plan to reconnect 12 miles of new trail by 2016. But first they need money and cooperation. Oregon Department of Transportation Planner Kristen Stallman visited Hood River twice this week to talk about the proposal.

The ambitious project comes with a hefty price tag. Friends of the Historic Columbia River Highway are working with ODOT and other groups to raise the money and interest level in putting a 16-foot-wide trail through the Gorge between Interstate 84 and the railroad.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



News and information from our partners

Comments

Comments are subject to moderator review and may not appear immediately on the site. A user's first several comments must be manually approved by a moderator.

Please read our commenting policy before posting.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from the News and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)