Yesteryears: ‘Woman Files for City Council’ in 1968

Hood River News: August 16, 2008: Peace Village: Kids and counselors run fast during a “Mosquito, Salmon, Bear” game during the week-long Peace Village at Columbia Hills Grange near Lyle. Churches and organizations combined to sponsor games, activities, fieldtrips and workshops based at the Grange for kids 5-14 from Hood River, Klickitat and Skamania counties. In addition to crafts, skits, games and snacks, students learned drumming, yoga, storytelling and about peaceful conflict resolution, healthy nutrition and respect for the environment. Gorge Ecumenical Miniseries and Faith in Action helped fund the first Peace village to be held in the Gorge. Photo by Kirby Neumann-Rea.

Hood River News archives
Hood River News: August 16, 2008: Peace Village: Kids and counselors run fast during a “Mosquito, Salmon, Bear” game during the week-long Peace Village at Columbia Hills Grange near Lyle. Churches and organizations combined to sponsor games, activities, fieldtrips and workshops based at the Grange for kids 5-14 from Hood River, Klickitat and Skamania counties. In addition to crafts, skits, games and snacks, students learned drumming, yoga, storytelling and about peaceful conflict resolution, healthy nutrition and respect for the environment. Gorge Ecumenical Miniseries and Faith in Action helped fund the first Peace village to be held in the Gorge. Photo by Kirby Neumann-Rea.



1918 — 100 years ago

A siren fire alarm, guaranteed to waken the soundest sleeper in the city, was ordered last week by the city council. The alarm will be sent from Denver on trial. If it has the ear-rending and hair-raising qualities which are promised, it is hoped that it will at last solve the problem which has been vexing the city fire department lo these many years. Because of the peculiar contour of the city, it has been found impossible to get a bell that would reach all parts of the city and awaken the firemen, some of whom are notoriously heavy sleepers.

1928 — 90 years ago

Late last Saturday night a number of local Crag Rats, who were recently trained in forest fire fighting methods, were given an opportunity to put their training to practical test when they were called to fight fire near Mist Falls on the Columbia River Highway. Shortly before and after midnight, a number of the Crag Rats went down the highway and were soon at work extinguishing the fire, which had originated in two shacks and had spread to the surrounding bush.

Verbatim: Brewery plans growth

The news is good news, says Jerome Chicvara, bubbling over with possibilities for its present facility, as soon as the Port of Hood River can ready expansion space.

Chicvara approached the port commission earlier this month, asking to expand in three directions, beginning in 1989. He wants the basement of the facility’s present building, a boiler room, and a portion of the basement of the Cannery building. So far, it’s all in the planning stages; nothing is signed.

“We’re in the process of acquiring a major-league bottling machine,” Chicvara said. With retailers “crying for our beer,” a major concern of the company is to control its growth.

By spring of 1989, the brewery wants to be in the Press Room basement; by early summer, into the boiler room. Cold storage space in the Cannery basement would come “as soon as the port is ready.”

The manufactures of Full Sail Golden Ale are turning out 4,500 cases a month now, Chicvara said — 3,800 barrels a year. Within 12 to 18 months, the company should have a very respectable payroll, he said.

Chicvara harked forward to the day when the brewing company will have to close out its brew pub and substitute a tasting room — the day it exceeds the output allowed to “mini-breweries.”

The company’s distributor says the could market that amount now, Chicvara said, but the brewery isn’t ready to do that.

The demand is there, and the company is striving to meet it, he said.

“We have a tiger by the tail.”

— Hood River News, August 17, 1988

1938 — 80 years ago

The first major shipment of apple brandy, via the Panama Canal to New York, was recently made by the Hood River Distilling Company, when 30,000 gallons of apple brandy was forwarded by the water route to the eastern seaboard. On Monday of this week, another shipment of 8,000 gallons of Hood River apple wine was forwarded to New Jersey. According to E.R. Pooley, these Hood River distilled products are now rapidly finding favor among consumers in the east, and the future prospect is bright, indeed.

1948 — 70 years ago

Job opportunities increased substantially, and unemployment compensation claims decreased almost to the vanishing point during July in the Hood River area, states C. Gordon Brownell, manager of the local employment office. Food processing and wholesale trades offered the greatest employment opportunities of any local industry, aside from seasonal agriculture. Logging and lumber industries were operating at a high level of employment and no surplus of labor for this type of work exists.

1958 — 60 years ago

Hood River spins toward its peak employment period with jobs in canneries, warehouse and orchards expected to add another 5,000 people to the local labor force. This, although unemployment at present is still running higher than last year, according to the local employment office. Construction in the area looks to be tailing off. Two new cold storage jobs at Odell and Hood River are near completion with workers due to end their jobs there about Sept. 1.

1968 — 50 years ago

Woman Files for Council — Hood River’s political pot, simmering slowly on the back burner most of the summer, began to show a little steam this week with the addition of new names in both city and county races. Gen Jernstedt, wife of State Rep. Ken Jernstedt, has filed for one of three positions up for grabs this fall on the city council. Mrs. Dan Hanners turned in Mrs. Jernstedt’s petitions. “First, I feel there should be a woman on the city council,” said Mrs. Hanners Wednesday, “and Gen is one of the most qualified women we’ve had in a long time. She’s full of ideas and could do a lot for Hood River.”

1978 — 40 years ago

Dethman Manor, new residential project for the aged in Hood River, officially became part of the community Sunday. And when they dedicated it, they did it with style. Sen. Mark Hatfield came here to deliver dedicatory remarks and to look the facility over. He addressed a standing-room only crowd that surprised the people making the arrangements. More chairs had to be found for the crowd that numbered 150 or more, and even then there were still people left to stand at the rear and outside the central recreation room.

1988 — 30 years ago

The completion date is still a few years off, but reconstruction of the Second Street overpass leading into Hood River is on a fast track with the Oregon Department of Transportation and a public meeting this month will introduce the subject to local residents. The meeting will also update progress of citizens’ and technical advisory committees, both of which have local members; the committees help keep the department of transportation informed on local concerns and issues related to the construction work. The project is scheduled for completion by 1992.

1998 — 20 years ago

If you’re at all superstitious, this is the year to be especially careful about fires. Since 1990, the worst fires in Oregon have occurred in the even-numbered years and this month the Rowena fire, which burned some 2,300 acres, followed the pattern. Continued hot, dry weather has a number of jurisdictions, including several Hood River County fire districts, imposing burning restrictions for the remainder of the summer.

2008 — 10 years ago

Officials from East and Middle Fork irrigation districts are looking for reassurance water rights will be protected in a new master plan for Mount Hood. “The devil’s in the details and we need specific language written into this bill that guarantees our ability to provide water to the farmers of this valley,” said Dave Crompton, semi-retired manager and consultant for Middle Fork. He is joined in that stance by John Buckley, manager of East Fork. Both brought their concerns before the county commission at last week’s discussion of the Wilderness proposal known as Oregon Treasurers.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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