Yesteryears: Cooper Spur ‘practical’ in 1938

Hood River News, Aug. 29, 1968: Manser Day at the Fruit Tree Sunday found the guest of honor ready to sit down after a long day of visiting. Estimates of the crowd gathering to honor the artist varied from 400 to 600. Six Manser works of art were sold, along with several others at the gallery. The event honored Manser, dean of area artists. Seated beside the refreshment table, he sips apple juice and chats with guests. Standing behind him is his granddaughter, Mrs. Marilyn Avolio.

Hood River News archives
Hood River News, Aug. 29, 1968: Manser Day at the Fruit Tree Sunday found the guest of honor ready to sit down after a long day of visiting. Estimates of the crowd gathering to honor the artist varied from 400 to 600. Six Manser works of art were sold, along with several others at the gallery. The event honored Manser, dean of area artists. Seated beside the refreshment table, he sips apple juice and chats with guests. Standing behind him is his granddaughter, Mrs. Marilyn Avolio.



1918 — 100 years ago

To the people of Hood River County: At the opening of business Monday, Sept. 2, we go on the card system of rationing sugar to two pounds per month per person. When a family makes its first purchase of sugar in September, it will be necessary for the husband or wife to go to the store, read the card carefully, sign it and leave it with the merchant. This signing of the card cannot be delegated to a child or other representative of the family. After the first purchase is made, succeeding purchases may be made by phone. At the end of the month, cards will be turned in to the food administer for checking. Help, please, to make this as easy as possible. Sincerely, L.B. Gibson

Verbatim: Wy’east Gets Science Texts On Loan

Wy’east learned this week that it is to be one of 150 high schools in the nation to receive science textbooks under a special program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The grant was apparently connected with Assistant Principal Chuck Bowe’s recent studies at Stanford University. Bowe attended the California school on a National Science Foundation fellowship. He learned of the textbook program there.

The valley school will receive its books on a traveling library arrangement. At the first of the school year, Wy’east will receive about 200 science texts, valued at approximately $900.

All books have been evaluated as the best high school science texts available. The school will keep the set for nine weeks, then move them along to another school in the program. At that time, Wy’east will receive another set of texts in the rotation textbook program.

“We feel it is a singular honor for the school,” said Principal Wayne Flynn this week. “It’s an opportunity few schools in the nation will have and our faculty will do everything possible to see that the students make maximum use of it.”

— Hood River News, August 28, 1958

1928 — 90 years ago

“Whiskey,” a reminder of the days when the county was wet, very wet, and since used to designate a new road on the East side, will cease to be in evidence from now on, as a result of a decision arrived at between the County Court and the State Highway commission this week. Henceforth the road will be known as “Pomona Market Road,” though it is probable that many residents of the section which it serves and who have not concerned themselves with the controversy over the road name will find themselves unconsciously referring to it by its old name.

1938 — 80 years ago

One of the surest signs that summer is on the wane was displayed in Hood River yesterday when George Y. Morrison, proprietor of the Electric Kitchen, reopened his bowling alleys in preparation for another local ten-pin season. The bowling room has been completely repainted and refinished, and the alleys fairly shine with six new coats of shellac. All refinishing was done by Orville Hatch, who managed the alleys a good many years ago.

Members of Hood River Ski Club, who spent last Sunday at the new ski area, developed by the Forest Service and the CCC near the junction of Cooper Spur Road, are highly enthusiastic over the work which has been already accomplished, to the end that Hood River Valley shall have one of the most practical ski areas in Oregon.

1948 — 70 years ago

All students in grades one to six who live in the Odell area west of Lippman Road and the Summit area will receive their schooling this year in the Central Vale school, according to an announcement by Ralph E. Jones, county school district superintendent. As was reported last week, it will be necessary to transfer some elementary students from the Odell school to Central Vale because of a lack of space at Odell and the availability of an extra classroom at Central Vale School.

1958 — 60 years ago

With AGA cannery humming through the peak of the Bartlett season, most major valley packers were working hard to get the first fall pear crop off to the canners and fresh fruit markets as Anjou time nears. Duckwall Bros. will begin to pack the winter Anjous Friday, Aug. 29 while AGA growers begin packing Anjous Monday from the lower west side. The Cascade packing operation will open Tuesday, says the association.

1968 — 50 years ago

A “task force” whose goal will be to help provide a personality for a new high school in Hood River Valley started its work last Thursday. Fourteen persons, including four students, listened to a presentation by Ed Stanley of the Crown Company, who outlined previous efforts. The aim between now and September 1970, the target date for the school opening, will be to provide a name, mascot, colors, coat of arms and a number of other items for the building that will unite Hood River and Wy’east high schools.

1978 — 40 years ago

The Columbia River Labor Day Cross Channel Swim has been ready to go since June in terms of filling the 150-person roster, but the Chamber of Commerce needs more water safety instructors to swim with the group Monday and more boaters to deliver swimmers to the other side of the river and keep an eye on them as they swim the estimated 1.1-mile distance back to the shore by the Hood River Inn. A record number of applications were received, with more than 200 persons on the waiting list.

1988 — 30 years ago

A new challenge and continued opportunity to work with people awaits Bill Baker of Hood River, who leaves as general manager of KIHR/KCGB FM Sept. 1 to become administrator for the new Down Manor retirement center. Baker will be wrapping up a 27-year career in the broadcasting business, with 24 of those years spent at the local station. “I decided I needed to do something different,” he said, recalling the advice he’s given to new station employees. “I tell them that if you’re going into broadcasting just because it’s a job and you receive a paycheck, then you’d better not go into broadcasting.”

1998 — 20 years ago

It will no longer sit in readiness for the next emergency call, but Engine 5 will remain a valued member of the Hood River Fire Department. Thanks to the efforts of 14 of the department’s volunteer firefighters, the 36-year-old truck will stay in Hood River, serving as a training and back0up vehicle for volunteers, as well as a participant in local parades and other community events. Despite its age, the engine remained in operational service with the department until this year. With the purchase last year of two brand-new trucks, the city placed the old vehicle, a 1962 American LaFrance, on the surplus list. Volunteers petitioned to keep the truck, indicating they would be responsible for its maintenance and upkeep.

2008 — 10 years ago

Juliyen Davis, Keenen Collins and Ellen Hudon are three small-town elementary school students with one big idea. It’s simple. So simple, in fact, that the three don’t understand why people around the world don’t already do it and why people aren’t required to do it. The idea is to stop using plastic bags. This summer, Collins, Davis and Davis’ father, Robert, put together a slide show presentation about plastic bags and their effect on the environment and presented it to city council. Then they pitched the idea of having an official Bring Your Own Bag month in Hood River to encourage and challenge people to stop using so many bags. The council approved the idea.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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