Terminal backers respond to denial

Maureen Hildreth, center, attends a public hearing on a proposed southwest Washington state massive oil-handling facility in Ridgefield, Wash., in 2016. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Jan. 29 rejected a permit for a massive oil-by-rail terminal proposed along the Columbia River.

Photo by Natalie Behring/The Columbian via AP
Maureen Hildreth, center, attends a public hearing on a proposed southwest Washington state massive oil-handling facility in Ridgefield, Wash., in 2016. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Jan. 29 rejected a permit for a massive oil-by-rail terminal proposed along the Columbia River.



Vancouver, Wash. (AP) — The joint venture that wanted to build what would have been the nation’s largest oil-by-rail terminal says Gov. Jay Inslee’s rejection of a permit “sends a clear anti-development message.”

The Vancouver Energy project, a venture of Savage Companies and Andeavor, formerly known as Tesoro Corp., proposed to receive about 360,000 barrels of North American crude oil a day by trains at the port of Vancouver along the Columbia River.

Inslee, in rejecting the permit Monday, said the risks and impacts outweighed the need for and potential benefits of the project. Inslee agreed with the recommendation of a state energy panel, which unanimously voted in November to recommend that the project be denied.

Vancouver Energy officials said in a statement Jan. 30, “With this decision, the governor is rejecting much‐needed family‐wage jobs and over $2 billion in economic value for Southwest Washington.

The decision also forgoes the opportunity to bolster America’s energy security by providing state‐of‐the‐art infrastructure that enables environmental benefits and a cleaner energy future.”

The company representatives said the final Environmental Impact Statement showed the project wouldn’t have any significant impacts that couldn’t be mitigated. They said they’re evaluating their options in response to Inslee’s denial.

Vancouver Energy disagreed and said the denial was “anti-development,” and that impacts the terminal caused could be mitigated.

The company has not announced whether they will appeal the governor’s decision, but representatives said they will consider their options.



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