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Yesteryears: Class of ’38 votes to wear formals, suits to graduation ceremony

February 9, 1978: Lucy Gillespie’s Girl Scout troop turned their creative talents to doing something with apples and pears recently, and came up with these marshmallow people. Their ideas will be used in food page releases distributed across the United States by Diamond Fruit Growers Association. From left to right are Michelle Reinig, Jill Whittaker, Karen Beardsley, Jill Gillespie, Molly Booth, Kim Rath, Jill Radliff and Tina Maldonado. Mrs. Gillespie says food projects are popular with the troop and they enjoy this way of learning and sampling new things. Allan J. DeLay photo.

Hood River News archives
February 9, 1978: Lucy Gillespie’s Girl Scout troop turned their creative talents to doing something with apples and pears recently, and came up with these marshmallow people. Their ideas will be used in food page releases distributed across the United States by Diamond Fruit Growers Association. From left to right are Michelle Reinig, Jill Whittaker, Karen Beardsley, Jill Gillespie, Molly Booth, Kim Rath, Jill Radliff and Tina Maldonado. Mrs. Gillespie says food projects are popular with the troop and they enjoy this way of learning and sampling new things. Allan J. DeLay photo.



1918 — 100 years ago

According to Postmaster Beavis, the impression has been given that it is necessary for German aliens only to register. The fact is that all citizens of countries now at war with the United States are required to register with the postmaster during the present week and a serious penalty attaches if they fail to do so. As yet less than a half dozen German citizens have registered with Mr. Beavis.

VERBATIM: ‘Citizens of 1957’ at Capacity Awards Banquet

In a crowded banquet hall at the Wy’east cafeteria last Friday evening, over 150 guests applauded in pleased surprise as three county citizens were named winners of the “Citizen of the Year” awards by three organizations sponsoring the honor.

Senior Citizen of the Year is Lee Foster, local agricultural extension agent, who has been extremely active in county agriculture, church and social activities.

The Jaycees gave their award of Junior Citizen of the Year to Bill Henry, manager of the U.S. National Bank in Hood River, last year’s chamber of commerce president.

To Mrs. E. Riddell Lage went the nomination “Woman of the Year” by the AAUW of Hood River County. Mrs. Lage has served valley school, home economics and church activities steadily in recent years.

Highlight of the banquet was the presentation of the awards. Dick Jones, last year’s junior citizen winner, called Bill Henry to the dais. Percy Bucklin, last year’s winner of the senior citizen award, presented Lee Foster with his plaque. Mrs. Ben Scott, 1956 woman of the year, announced Mrs. Lage to be this year’s winner.

In a major event of the banquet, Ivan Bloch, industrial consultant to Governor Robert D. Holmes, reviewed the development potential of the Columbia River are for the audience. He called upon local citizens to remain “alert to the reality of an expanding empire here.” Mr. Bloch listed recent freight rate increases as the major block to realization of Oregon’s industrial ambitions.

— Hood River News, February 6, 1958

1928 — 90 years ago

The long-deferred question of the city council taking any part in the provision of an airport for Hood River was once again before the city fathers on Monday evening, when a committee from the chamber of commerce, headed by E.O. Blanchar, appeared at the council chamber to urge the importance of having this question quickly decided for or against. The proposal has been before the council since early fall of last year, but no definite action had been taken until Monday, when the project was referred to the street committee, which will now investigate the matter from various angles and finally report back to the council as a whole, when some action may be taken.

1938 — 80 years ago

Caps And Gowns To Remain In Discard: The seniors cling to tradition! Again, as always has been the case in the past, the issue of caps and gowns for the graduating seniors at Hood River High School has been defeated. The members of the class of ’38 chose several days ago to wear formals and dark suits for graduation. The vote was 42 to 26, a considerable increase for caps and gowns, there being fewer than five votes for them last year. The next task before seniors is to choose the type of corsage or flowers to wear with formals and the type of announcement cards. A committee is now working on exercises for class day.

1948 — 70 years ago

Possibility of selling the old city park site was considered by the city council Monday evening, and the street committee was directed to investigate the tract with such a view in mind. While the issue was brought up by an inquiry from Jaymar Wholesale Lumber company, which needs additional land space from time to time, there have been a number of requests for purchase of lots in the park area, now in complete disuse. As one councilman expressed it, the city has refused to sell the property piecemeal, but might now consider putting up the entire tract of land for bid. The park area was purchased by the city some 25 years ago at a time when most communities were building camping areas for tourists. Purchase price of the 33 acres was $16,000.

1958 — 60 years ago

In a contest well calculated to keep everybody in amused suspense, the Wy’east faculty will engage the county school faculty in a donkey basketball game at Wy’east gym Saturday night. With all proceeds due to fill the school’s athletic fund, the game promises a see-saw hee-haw battle from start to finish. The game, as most fans know, is played astride donkeys with rubber shoes. A player may not make any basketball play unless he is astride his mount. The critters are the property of Cliff Dunham, an equine impresario who specializes in this sort of thing.

1968 — 50 years ago

A start in construction for Parkdale school addition and a new West Side elementary school has been set back one month, school officials had determined this week. “We had hoped to bid these two projects in February for a construction start in March,” said Superintendent Arnold Bowers. Now, because of delays in the final planning, bidding has been scheduled for the second week in March, with a construction start in April. Bowers said the delay hasn’t changed the completion timetable. The West Side unit is due for readiness by Jan. 1 of 1969, while the Parkdale school addition should be ready about a month earlier.

1978 — 40 years ago

An increase in water rates for users on the Hood River system appears inevitable soon, city council learned Tuesday. At the same time the committee discussed another plan which might reduce the rates again for users inside the city limits.

As of Tuesday, there was no Greyhound bus depot in Hood River for the first time in years. It all might change before the week is out, but for the time being there is no “home” for Greyhound here. Bev Fisk shut the office down, stopped taking freight and stopped selling tickets. She had been trying to have the facility moved from her health food store on Oak near First for weeks so she could start remodeling, and finally shut off the service.

1988 — 30 years ago

Skyrocketing property taxes and concerns over educational quality are prompting some Mosier residents to seek a boundary change that would bring them within the Hood River County School District. “It’s not a few people. This is the whole valley,” stated Jerry Dishion, one of three leaders behind a committee called “Mosier Valley Citizens for Positive Action.”

Groundbreaking began Monday on a new, 86-room expansion project at Hood River Village Resort, and plans are proceeding quickly for an associated retail center and nightclub, plus renovation of the existing facility.

1998 — 20 years ago

When the 1998 Winter Olympics begin this Friday in Nagano, Japan, Columbia Gorge residents will have a local athlete to cheer for. Mike Jacoby of Underwood is part of the inaugural 14-member U.S. Olympic snowboarding team. He competes in the Men’s Giant Slalom, which will air at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 7 on CBS.

While it shut down two of its other mills, the parent company of Hanel Lumber expects the Hood River facilities to remain in operation while it proceeds with bankruptcy proceedings. That parent company, Hood Lumber Company, is waiting for a ruling from a bankruptcy court in Portland on its draft business plan.

2008 — 10 years ago

A quarter-century of wind sports tradition shifts to a new owner with the sale Tuesday of Windance. Dave Nunn purchased the store from Brian Carlstrom, who founded it in 1983 and opened it in a garage in 1984. Windance is located on Highway 35 near Highway 30 next to Tum-A-Lum Lumber. Nunn will keep the name, location and “feeling” of the store, the longest running such business in Hood River County.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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