Yesteryears: Hood River County Library celebrates 85th anniversary in 1998

February 29, 1968: Down go the trees in an orchard where the county school district plans to build a new high school near Windmaster corner. The Cat driven by Dave Princehouse of Dee Flat is pushing trees into huge piles for burning. Glen Adams, contractor, expects to have the trees down by the end of the week. Two blocks are being saved in areas where they can be used for school purposes. School boardmen authorized the removal before spraying becomes necessary. The board pondered, then discarded, the idea of preserving the orchard through harvest season, with FFA boys managing the acreage.

Hood River News archives
February 29, 1968: Down go the trees in an orchard where the county school district plans to build a new high school near Windmaster corner. The Cat driven by Dave Princehouse of Dee Flat is pushing trees into huge piles for burning. Glen Adams, contractor, expects to have the trees down by the end of the week. Two blocks are being saved in areas where they can be used for school purposes. School boardmen authorized the removal before spraying becomes necessary. The board pondered, then discarded, the idea of preserving the orchard through harvest season, with FFA boys managing the acreage.



1918 — 100 years ago

Notice was served upon Hood River merchants Monday that they will be required to reduce the number of daily deliveries in pursuance to a requirement for greater economy made by the National Food Administration. The merchants were notified that a representative of the Food Administration would be here last evening to meet with them and discuss how the matter might be arranged most conveniently and economically. Most local grocery and butcher stores have ben maintaining three deliveries a day. It was expected that this number would have to be reduced to one delivery a day in order to comply with the requirements of the government.

VERBATIM: Mount Hood Area Well Advertised

Scenic Attractions Of This Area Given National Publicity By Oregon’s Travel Bureau

Adopting the theme of air conditioning for tourists, the Travel Advisory board and bureau of the State Highway Commission is now releasing a series of advertising appeals to tourists in all parts of the nation. The first series of advertisements appear in the Saturday Evening Post, American Magazine, Collier’s, National Geographic, Field and Stream, Outdoor Life, Sports Afield, Hunting and Fishing and the through the Where-To-Go bureaus.

Mount Hood, the Mount Hood Loop Highway, the Columbia River Highway and Hood River Valley are featured in several of these advertisements and will, without question, bring many tourists to this section, and not a few will also take in Bonneville Dam, which is also given a place as one of the attractions of Oregon.

There is every indication of a heavy influx of tourists into Oregon this year, according to Harold B. Say, the efficient manager of the Travel Bureau, which is financed, together with the national advertising, by the Highway Commission by utilizing a small percentage of money raised by gasoline taxes. Hugh G. Ball, editor of the News, is a member of the Travel Advisory board.

— Hood River News, March 4, 1938

1928 — 90 years ago

Whether Mount Hood, once an active volcano, will ever show signs of life again, even in the most remote future, will be one of the things to be studied by Dr. Edwin T. Hodge, professor of economic geology of the University of Oregon, in a survey of the mountain to be made this summer. The area to be surveyed is founded on the east by Hood River, the west by the Willamette valley, the south by the Cascade River and the north by the Columbia River area. “Mount Hood is the outstanding example at the phalanx of the volcanic group that fronted on the Pacific Ocean,” said Dr. Hodge. “Of especial interest will be determining if it will ever be active again, and just how long it was active.”

1938 — 80 years ago

If it appears that there is an over-generous use of electricity at the city hall, it should be kept in mind that the building is now being supplied with power for lighting from its own municipal system on the Heights. The switch over from Pacific Power & Light Co.’s service was made this week.

Pine Grove Grange will hold a card party on March 5 at 8 p.m. Ladies are asked to bring pies and card tables.

1948 — 70 years ago

State Highway Commission surveyors were on the job early this week, making what is said to be the final survey of the road between the foot of Tucker hill and on past the Stone store corner at Odell. This two-mile stretch has received state attention for several years and there is more than a possibility that it will be rebuilt this summer. In its present state it has been the bane of motorists for many years, and its reconstruction will be highly appreciated.

1958 — 60 years ago

James E. Klahre, general manager of the Apple Growers Association, was elected president of the U.S. National Fruit Export Council at the group’s recent meeting in Washington, D.C. The council represents fruitgrowing areas throughout the nation. They have been holding a series of conferences in Washington with departmental officials and congressional leaders.

Hood River County and Mosier were officially installed as Neighborhood No. 3 of the Mid-Columbia Girl Scout Council, after a meeting by the council development committee in The Dalles last week. This will bring local Scout chapters under an area-wide organization.

1968 — 50 years ago

Other parts of Oregon may be experiencing a February heat wave, but 60-degrees in Hood River is nothing new. The Hood River Experiment Station reports that last Saturday’s 64-degree weather has been matched or beaten a number of times in the last 14 years. As recently as 1965, Hood River reordered a high February temperature of 66 degrees with a low for the month of 27 degrees. If cold weather’s more to your taste, Hood River County’s had that in February, too. In 1956, high for February was 49, and the low was a minus two degrees.

1978 — 40 years ago

“We served close to 1,000 people, we’ll probably have about $1,600 for scholarships,” said Chairman Pat Crompton after the last bit of sauce cleared from the annual Hood River Valley High School spaghetti feed Friday. The dinner, which has become one of the school’s major annual events, was held in conjunction with a school open house and dedication of a new little theater building. “Well over 100 people helped out,” said Mrs. Crompton. Of those, several were Boy Scouts from the Odell troop, who did a lot of dishwashing.

1988 — 30 years ago

Oregon Department of Transportation officials were urged to proceed with upgrading Hood River’s Second Street overpass and also take a look at improving a stretch of Highway 35 just north of Mt. Hood-Parkdale during a public hearing here Tuesday. State transportation officals held the public hearing at the Waucoma building last week to record testimony concerning its preliminary six-year highway improvement report. One of the top local projects addressed was the proposed $4.4 million upgrading of the Second Street overpass, Hood River’s east end overpass which serves the Port of Hood River’s light industrial area. The transportation department’s six-year plan projects the overpass construction in 1994.

1998 — 20 years ago

The Hood River County Library is celebrating its 85th anniversary with a celebration at the Waucoma Center on Wasco Street. “The Library Board and Friends of the Library have decided that the best way to celebrate the last 85 years is to plan for the next century,” said spokesperson Elizabeth Garber. Input from the community is being sought in the preparation of a long-range plan.

2008 — 10 years ago

Parkdale orchardist Kate McCarthy told U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., on Saturday that Congress needed to get “sensible” about immigration reform and adopt a guest worker program. “If we can’t get our crops picked, we’ll lose our farm land. And if we lose our farm land, we lose our food. You’ve got to do something about this situation back in Washington, D.C.,” she said. She gained agreements from Wyden that federal officials had failed citizens by not dealing with the controversial issue last year.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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