Yesteryears: Saddle Club rodeo a highlight in 1948

Hood River News: July 17, 1958: This Way To The Fly-In — Follow the sign, say the queens of the annual Cascade Locks Fly-In as they promote attendance to the Hood River County town’s celebration this Saturday and Sunday. Left to right are Princess Agnes Ann Nix, Queen Carolyn Kendrick, Princess Joann Sherill and Princess Lois Pape. Queen Carolyn will be crowed Saturday evening at the Cascade Locks High School.

Hood River News archives
Hood River News: July 17, 1958: This Way To The Fly-In — Follow the sign, say the queens of the annual Cascade Locks Fly-In as they promote attendance to the Hood River County town’s celebration this Saturday and Sunday. Left to right are Princess Agnes Ann Nix, Queen Carolyn Kendrick, Princess Joann Sherill and Princess Lois Pape. Queen Carolyn will be crowed Saturday evening at the Cascade Locks High School.



1918 — 100 years ago

In order to accommodate a number of autoists (sic) who wanted to come from Cascade Locks to Hood River, the steamer Tahoma recently tried the experiment of loading 18 cars and their occupants on a barge and starting for this city. Soon after passing Stevenson, it was discovered that the barge was leaking badly and in danger of sinking. In just the nick of time, the barge was beached. Arrangements were made to get the cars off and drive them to Carson. This took most of the night. Mrs. H.S. Butterfield and daughter, Miss Genevieve, were among the passengers on the barge.

Verbatim: Storm Rips Valley Area

A sunny day turned into a grim one briefly here Saturday as an electrical storm moved over the valley during the afternoon.

It touched all parts of the valley, but the upper valley was most seriously affected. Several residents reported that their television sets were knocked out by lightning, which apparently hit the cable in one area. Two horses on the Clay Simon place on Miller Road were killed when lightning hit the tree they were standing under.

The U.S. Forest Service reported no fires in the Hood River district, but that there were some in other districts of the Mt. Hood National Forest.

Pine Grove Firemen answered a fire call to the hills east of Hood River when lightning struck, but either the fire was put out by rain or burned itself out before the firemen arrived.

One reason the lightning might not have started forest fires was that it was accompanied by heavy rain. Over a third of an inch fell in a brief period in the upper valley.

There were still some cherries on Hood River Valley trees, but Diamond Fruit Growers reported while there was some splitting because of the rain, it was not serious. The company has just about cleared up its Hood River Valley crop, and was working on the “tag end” of it when the rains came.

The storm apparently didn’t result in any damage to pears and apples.

— Hood River News, July 20, 1978

1928 — 90 years ago

Fusing to a degree which caused it to emit a blinding flash of light, a meteor descended about midnight of Sunday and fell into the Columbia River, at a point described as between the mouth of the Hood River and the Underwood boat landing.

While a number of people report that their homes were lighted up by the flash of light as the meteor fell, only a few state they actually saw the meteor in its blazing path to the river. One of these was Roy Kelly, Swift salesman, who was on his way home to the Heights. He states that the flash of light was almost blinding in its intensity, but he heard no noise when the meteor struck the Columbia River. As a general rule, these meteorites burn out before they reach the earth, and in their passage they strongly resemble a fast moving comet.

1938 — 80 years ago

Just about the time that many of those who were to make the 18th Annual Legion Climb of Mount Hood and who had bedded down under the alpine pines and hemlocks a few hours before, had really lapsed into their first sleep, a blast of a siren brought Legion camp to life. For it was the signal that all prospective climbers must be up and doing, make final touches to their equipment, eat breakfast, secure the meal for the mountain and form into line at the sound of the whistles of Crag Rats. Snow conditions were just right for the 88 who reached the summit.

1948 — 70 years ago

Around 4,000 or more Hood River Valley residents and visitors took in the two-day rodeo staged here last Saturday and Sunday by the Hood River Saddle Club with a capacity crowd of 2,500 attending the final program Sunday.

Once again, it’s time for the annual Mount Hood Legion Climb, sponsored by the Hood River American Legion Post No. 22, and cars will be loaded with camping equipment tomorrow (Saturday) for the journey up to mile-high Legion camp on the north slope and the big, two-day event.

1958 — 60 years ago

Tossing the problem of getting cooperative-delivered power to the AGA squarely in the lap of that organization, the Hood River Electric Co-op suddenly abandoned its drive to string co-op power lines inside the city limits this week. The decision came after a meeting with the co-op board of directors held July 14. Indicating their assessment of the forces against their move as too powerful to buck, the directors carefully dictated two letters of withdrawal to their manager, Willard Johnson.

1968 — 50 years ago

For the first time in eight years, there’s a race for the position of Hood River County Sheriff.

Local police Sergeant Richard Kelly has entered his name as a candidate for the law enforcement job. He will oppose Sheriff Rupert Gillmouthe, who has held the position since 1947.

A sweet cherry season that was “not so sweet” was going into its final days in the Hood River Valley this week. Stadelman Packing Co. and Diamond Fruit Growers, the two major handlers of sweet cherries in this area, both were picking up the tag ends of a harvest that ran about 35 percent of normal — or less.

1978 — 40 years ago

Land-use planning is at various stages in the different areas of Hood River County, hitting a few “rough spots” along the way, but “generally going along quite well,” according to Gary Gidley, planning coordinator for the county. “There have been some rough spots,” he said.

“Some people are against any land-use controls. It balances out because there are just as many, or more, who want them.” As with a lot of things, what you think about land-use planning tends to reflect your own personal stake in the matter, he observed. If you happen to live in a neighborhood of one-acre lots, the fact that your next-door neighbor is allowed to put in a pig pen under the old ordinances might increase your appreciation of the new Comprehensive Plan if it disallowed that situation.

1988 — 30 years ago

It didn’t take an independent survey to tell something special was going on n Hood River last week. Oak Street parking, jammed with sailboard-toting cars, told the story. It was the Rainier Beer Gorge Pro Am event, the major extravaganza that brings top professional boardsailors from all over the world to Hood River. It also brought a lot of spectators — record numbers of them, the Port of Hood River says.

Their vehicle counter tally led to an estimate of 61,141 total for the July 8-17 scheduled event.

1998 — 20 years ago

The third time is, indeed, proving to be the charm for the Timberland Gorge Games. Midway through the weekend, the outdoor sports and music festival that features a total of 130 events, clinics and concerts, officials are happy with the number of entrants and spectators attending the Gorge Games.

A key event in the festival, which runs through Saturday, happens today at the Jaymar Skatepark in Hood River. The Rollerblade Demo Van will be at the park from 10 a.m. on, and completion in skateboarding and in-line skating will start after lunch.

2008 — 10 years ago

The Cold Springs fire expanded to more than 8,000 acres overnight and still has no target date for containment, according to reports from the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The lightning-caused fire is burning through rugged terrain about 11 miles northeast of Trout Lake. The blaze is fueled by dead, dying and diseased timber affected by spruce budworm infestation that began in the 1980s. More than 380 personnel are working the fire.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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