The Porch for July 21

In the lobby display case at Hood River Elks Lodge, “BPOE” spelled out in colorful enamel lodge pins, from visiting Elks. BPOE stands for Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

Photo by Kirby Neumann-Rea
In the lobby display case at Hood River Elks Lodge, “BPOE” spelled out in colorful enamel lodge pins, from visiting Elks. BPOE stands for Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.



WELL SAID: “A smirk isn’t silence.” — David James Duncan

WELL DONE: A pub manager comforting an upset server who had just dropped a tray of water glasses.

SEEN AND HEARD: … Woman carrying her pet dog on the last few blocks of their walk Tuesday evening … blackberries ripening … co-workers sharing zucchini, tomatoes, and cherries … kids selling cherries on the sidewalk in 98-degree weather Sunday … car with stick figure family of parents, five kids, cat, dog, bird, and goldfish … parent to group of kids: “Alright, be safe and use the crosswalk, and hold hands. Use the buddy system” … crews repainting yellow curb sections … READING/BUILDS/BRAINS — three library bricks (see page A3) at Georgiana Smith Park, now far easier to read thanks to last week’s work crew …

GUTSY GALS: That is just one of the team names from the recent Wild Woman Trail marathon and relay in Trout Lake (results in the July 25 edition), which also include these imaginatively-named teams: Flying Through the Forest (Hood River); Chicks In The Sticks (White Salmon); Squeaky Cheeks (Hood River); Girly Motor Trucks (Hood River) and Frisky Hens (Parkdale).

DRAMATIS VERITAS: When the “Spoon River Anthology” cast rehearsed among the trees on the HRVHS lawn last week, props included an old bench, dilapidated suitcase, kerosene lantern, and a weathered ax, all in keeping with the early-20th century time period and rural Illinois farm locale of the stories. So one rustic, yet unintended, prop seen a few feet from the actors gave the grove an authentic feel: The desiccated hide of a gray squirrel.

IN TRAFFIC: Driver creeping across busy Second and Oak intersection, honking at a pedestrian still in the crosswalk, and edging past the pedestrian just as they got out of his way.

Have you noticed the greatly increased foot traffic across the Second Street overpass in recent months?

MORE TRAFFIC: A week ago, this space praised the work of the traffic flaggers working the waterline replacement zone in Hood River, for class and patience in putting up with rude and often dangerous drivers. The paper had just hit the streets on the afternoon of July 13 when a report came of a driver who drove past a flagger’s upraised “STOP” sign. Police were notified, and an officer found the driver, who offered to return to the scene and apologize, and the flagger company asked that no citation be issued. It was one of two such incidents that day; police could not locate the other car.



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