Yesteryears: Odell Baptist opens new site in 1958

The Dynamos  Boy’s U-13 first-place team: Front row, from left, Brian Stenberg, Jimmy Woodruff, Jairo Rios, Alvaro Lara, Jake Pruitt, Bobby Divine and Efrain Romero. Back Row, from left, coach Rich Hanners, Michael Stenberg, Eric Flory, David Chance, Sean Rawson, Stephen Hanners, Tyler Nelson and coach Jim Divine. Not pictured: Luke Pennington, Erin Herman and David McCallun. Submitted photo.

Hood River News archives
The Dynamos  Boy’s U-13 first-place team: Front row, from left, Brian Stenberg, Jimmy Woodruff, Jairo Rios, Alvaro Lara, Jake Pruitt, Bobby Divine and Efrain Romero. Back Row, from left, coach Rich Hanners, Michael Stenberg, Eric Flory, David Chance, Sean Rawson, Stephen Hanners, Tyler Nelson and coach Jim Divine. Not pictured: Luke Pennington, Erin Herman and David McCallun. Submitted photo.



1918 — 100 years ago

Residents of Mosier and vicinity had a strenuous time fighting a forest fire last week. Starting three miles south of Mosier Tuesday, as the result of lightning, the fire burned up little Mosier creek for a distance of three miles before it was checked Friday night. The burned area is a half mile wide. Men patrolled the district Saturday to prevent a resumption of the conflagration, which destroyed considerable timber, but no buildings.

1928 — 90 years ago

With the building of a bridge this week by the Forest Service across the lower edge of the snout of Eliot Glacier below Cloud Cap Inn, the Cloud Cap-Eden Park trail is now accessible to all who are willing to undertake this journey in one of the most beautiful alpine parks of the entire West.

Lost Lake Camp Sites To Be Opened

What may be accepted as the last of The Dalles project to dam up Lost Lake comes in an announcement by District Ranger Walters that he has received orders to go ahead immediately with plans to develop Lost Lake as a tourist resort.

The first project will be the clearing of five acres for a camp site and the installation of one thousand feet of pipe line, with necessary standpipes for a supply of drinking water. Mr. Walters states the work will be started immediately.

Recently, as a result of the filing of The Dalles water bureau of a petition for a permit to build a dam at Lost Lake to impound the waters, the Forest Service suspended all development work at that famous resort, and the latest announcement of resumption of work on a larger scale than ever indicates beyond any doubt that the Forest Service has definitely rejected The Dalles project. Only two weeks ago, a special committee proceeded to The Dalles to listen to the views of the water bureau and later made the trip out to Lost Lake.

— Hood River News, July 27, 1928

1938 — 80 years ago

Contrary to what might have been expected, in view of unusual high temperatures for more than a week, culminating in a near record of 105 degrees on July 21, the damage to apples from sunscald is so small as to be entirely negligible and in many orchards, burned fruit is absent. It is worthy of note that, while temperatures were high, a heavy pall of smoke settled over all orchards, and many growers believe that this smoke, by partially obscuring the rays of the sun, helped to curtail sunscald. On several days, too, a distinct breeze prevailed and kept air in circulation.

1948 — 70 years ago

Over 3,500 people attended the 24th annual American Legion Mount Hood Climb last weekend, the largest attendance ever recorded at this yearly event high on the slopes of Mount Hood. A total of 126 climbers, representing seven different states, signed up for the climb and were escorted well up on the mountain by a group of over 30 guides. But avalanches from near the summit through the “chimney” area brought on by a week-long hot spell that preceded the climb dates, caused a halt to what many described as an otherwise “perfect climb.”

1958 — 60 years ago

Parishioners of the First Odell Baptist Church of Odell held their first services in that group’s new Odell church building on Clark Way last Sunday. The new church will be the scene of the organization’s regular service, revivals and Bible schools from now on. Last Saturday, final roofing work was completed on the structure. Members will now continue to finish the interior windows, doors, walls, etc. Members had been meeting in the Odell Grange Hall since 1954.

1968 — 50 years ago

Pat Tucker was thumbing through a copy of “Yankee” magazine for June when she stopped short at a picture of “America’s Finest Pottery.” Her discovery now has Pat and Norman Tucker wondering whether they are owners of a rare piece of pottery. “That looks like our rabbit plate,” said Pat, and sure enough, a quick check showed she was right. “We used to use this plate for serving cookies — things like that,” said Norman. “Now I’m so impressed I’m afraid to use it.”

1978 — 40 years ago

A “water emergency” looms as a reality in the days ahead if the weather doesn’t cool off and if some city residents don’t quit violating the sprinkling regulations, said Tom Senior, director of public works, and Jerry Branton, city engineer. The emergency situation arises when the reservoir that serves the city empties at a faster rate than it can refill, causing the average amount of water on hand at any one time to get progressively smaller. As strange as it may seem to some residents, that sprinkler out in the backyard can make a difference, Branton stressed, “and 40-50 sprinklers make a big difference.”

1988 — 30 years ago

Contracts have been signed and work will begin next week on the $623,000 reconstruction of Industrial Street, behind the Cannery building in the Port of Hood River’s Diamond project. This is one of two major street construction projects planned by the port of the Diamond project. The port anticipates receiving funding approval in November for a $655,000 reconstruction of a portion of Columbia Street.

Effective immediately and lasting until 6 a.m. on July 28, emergency water restrictions are in place for the City of Hood River.

1998 — 20 years ago

Woodman, don’t spare that tree. Especially when it’s leaning dangerously into 13th Street at the corner of Jackson Park. Steve Richter, owner of Columbia Tree Service, and his wife, Judy, were on their way to get ice cream Thursday afternoon when they spotted the giant 110-foot Ponderosa pine leaning, as Judy put it, “to the east,” an apparent victim of the high winds. Instead of ice cream, they went back to the office and made arrangements to cut the tree down. Thursday afternoon, Richter limbed the large fir tree and secured it with ropes attached to nearby trees. Winds were still too high for removal. May and 13th streets were closed off temporarily Friday morning at 6 a.m. Richter removed the tree and the possible danger it might have caused if it had fallen onto the road or nearby houses.

2008 — 10 years ago

The demolition of a church building yielded a rare find recently. Salvage crews discovered local timbers holding up the second floor of the Assembly of God Church, torn down at 12th and May streets as part of the expansion project at Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital. Jim Johnson, Providence’s construction manager, and workers for Anderson Construction spotted the rare wooden beams. The 24-foot beams are all clean, one-piece rough-sawn old growth Douglas fir. The hospital’s $50-million, 72,000 square foot expansion is now underway.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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