Yesteryears: New oak trees cause controversy in 1998

PHOTO: April 1, 1938 — Twenty-one members of the Hood River High senior class have attended local schools together ever since they entered the first grade nearly 12 years ago. Reading from left to right, they are: Front row, Julia French, Maxine Beck, Emma Rice, Michi Yasui, Marcia McClain, Ruth Finney, Neil Buckwald. Second row, Mary Alice Smith, Millard Carnes, Allyn Price, Edmund Muller, Billy Lee, Cleon Oldham, Arthur Hart, Myrtle Burns. Third row, Jack Loving, Gus Koberg, Chris Coulter, Chandler Smith, Ernest Colby and Bob Flint. HRN Photo-Engraving.

Hood River News archives
PHOTO: April 1, 1938 — Twenty-one members of the Hood River High senior class have attended local schools together ever since they entered the first grade nearly 12 years ago. Reading from left to right, they are: Front row, Julia French, Maxine Beck, Emma Rice, Michi Yasui, Marcia McClain, Ruth Finney, Neil Buckwald. Second row, Mary Alice Smith, Millard Carnes, Allyn Price, Edmund Muller, Billy Lee, Cleon Oldham, Arthur Hart, Myrtle Burns. Third row, Jack Loving, Gus Koberg, Chris Coulter, Chandler Smith, Ernest Colby and Bob Flint. HRN Photo-Engraving.



1918 — 100 years ago

It is stated that the Japanese are taught loyalty in their country. We have evidence of the effect of this teaching among her citizens that are here. Our Japanese neighbors are denied citizenship and a Hood River representative recently tried to have a law enacted to deprive them of the right to own land in Oregon, yet when two members of the War Savings Committee called upon Mr. Sato, who is renting a farm near Parkdale, they were assured by Mr. Sato that he already had bonds, would buy an additional amount of $200 worth, and that his friend on the Babson ranch would purchase a similar amount. The next place visited was that of an American-born citizen, who like too many others, required a super abundance of persuasion to coerce him to purchase a 25-cent Thrift stamp.

VERBATIM: It Wasn’t Alvie … Or Was It?

In a sports article appearing in the March 20 issue of the News, it was erroneously reported that Alvie Cunningham played with the Merle’s Market team that won the city championship after he completed his high school season at Wy’east.

The team, composed of five Cunninghams, all related, did have Alvie on the roster, but not THAT Alvie. You see, the Wy’east player is Alvie Joe, while Alvie Ray, who played for Merle’s, is a brother to Glenn, both the sons of A.B. Cunningham.

These two (or is it three) are cousins to teammates Les and Lucky, both brothers and sons of A.B. Cunningham’s brother, Lloyd Cunningham.

Meanwhile, back on the team, Charles Cunningham is the other member. Now Charlie is a cousin to Glenn, Alvie Ray, Les and Lucky, since his father is Russell Cunningham, who are the fathers of … anyway, Alvie Joe didn’t play with them!

— Hood River News, March 27, 1958

1928 — 90 years ago

With Julius L. Meier elected permanent chairman, the committee named by Secretary of Agriculture Jardine to recommend a development program for the Mount Hood recreation area went into action for the first time last Friday, when a meeting was held in Portland. While the main subject to be discussed is the projected Mount Hood Tramway, other projects to be discussed are a timberline road, the construction of a chalet at timberline and the Cloud Cap Inn situation. At the meeting, R.E. Scott, Hood River committeeman, reports that it is rumored that certain interests are attempting to obtain power rights at Lost Lake and to exploit the lake for commercial purposes.

1938 — 80 years ago

C.D. Nickelsen, pioneer resident of this county, has filed for Republican nomination for the post of county judge of Hood River County. He was being groomed for Congress, but thought life in Hood River Valley was preferable to that in the nation’s capital.

Jack Clarke, Dee school principal, will be a Republican candidate nomination as state representative. Clarke has attended the Oregon Normal School, Oregon State College and the University of Oregon. He was prominent in debate and other forensic activities at the first two mentioned schools. Red-headed and six and a half feet tall, Jack Clarke promises to be, if and when elected, the “biggest” representative in the Oregon legislature.

1948 — 70 years ago

Enforcement on parking meters on Hood River streets, which have been installed during the past two weeks, will commence next Monday. The meters are installed on the streets of the downtown business district and 12th Street on the Heights, with time limits varying form 12 minutes to two hours. The machines take pennies and nickels.

A Tourist Host School, prompted by the Hood River Chamber of Commerce, will be held in the council chamber of the City Hall at 8 p.m. on four evenings, April 6, 9, 12 and 15, and all who are interested in bringing more tourists to the Hood River County area are urged to take in at least one of these meetings.

1958 — 60 years ago

Bill Allen, weather bureau meteorologist for the Fruit Frost service, will begin a regular series of weather forecasts for the Hood River Valley this week, announced the sponsoring Traffic Association. The forecasts will be given over radio station KIHR twice each day. Mr. Allen plans to start the frost warnings “as soon as necessary” or when bud development warrants such information. The frost warnings will be given at 8 p.m. each evening. The service will continue until the first week of June.

1968 — 50 years ago

Richard Nixon, Republican candidate for president, will probably be a Hood River guest during the coming campaign. Rumor that Nixon has Hood River on his itinerary brought confirmation by Kenneth Jernstedt, county chairman for the Nixon campaign. He said Nixon plans at least two trips to Oregon, and at least one of them will include a trip to Hood River. “We haven’t received word exactly when he’ll be here,” Jernstedt said today, “but we’re sure he’s coming.” He also said there’s a good possibility that Nixon will stay here at least one night at the Hood River Village.

1978 — 40 years ago

City and county officials, facing a state deadline, met once again Tuesday in an effort to determine the 20-year maximum growth boundary for Hood River city limits. They didn’t get the issue settled, and the differences still appeared cavernous. But there was some movement, and at least some of the city council and the county board went away from the meeting feeling another session could prove fruitful. The big question mark from the first has centered on the commercial area south of Hood River along Tucker Road. The county has favored stretching the Urban Growth Boundary for the city as much as a mile to the south. The city council has consistently favored drawing the east-west line at Brookside and Eliot roads. It would preclude city sewer service for the next 20 years south of that line, and the outlying area includes Orchard Lanes, a grocery market, general store, nursery, tire store, car lots and other commercial enterprises.

1988 — 30 years ago

The number of skiers in the Pacific Northwest may double within 20 years, and Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort near Parkdale hopes to expand operations dramatically to accommodate that increase. Initial public comments are due April 10 as developers, the U.S. Forest Service and a private planning firm determine the exact nature of the proposed Meadows improvements, which at this point are outlined in three alternatives — including new lifts, new parking and as much as 1,000 new housing units.

1998 — 20 years ago

The good news is, they’re not dead — they’re meant to look that way. The bad news is, they’re meant to look that way. The new English columnar oak trees planted downtown as part of the Oak Avenue urban renewal project are prompting concerns and complaints from some merchants and citizens, who say the trees’ tenacious, mud brown foliage makes them a poor choice for the street, even if they do match the street’s name.

Extending the school year and adding all-day kindergarten gained support from Hood River County School District’s board of directors during a recent work session. Board members Anne Saxby and Bev Annala said they’d like to see kindergarten expanded. That early boost would help students along the path to mastering educational requirements in the 21st century, Annala said.

2008 — 10 years ago

Hood River City Mayor Linda Streich said on Monday there should be no doubt where the city council stands on the casino issue. “They (Cascade Locks) are not going to get a neutral stance because we don’t want it anywhere in the National Scenic Area,” said Streich following the council’s March 24 meeting. However, she said Hood River does not want to get involved in Cascade Locks city policy-making. So, if a casino is allowed by the federal government and the high courts, she said it should be sited in Cascade Locks and not the steep slope just east of Hood River.

— Complied by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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