Board hears bond update, HRV lockdown report

May 23 meeting will include presentations on climate change class project

FOUNDATIONS take shape along with utility connections as construction bond-funded work continues at May Street Elementary, where a new school is being constructed. The current building will be used in the 2018-19 school year, and then demolished.

Photo by Kirby Neumann-Rea
FOUNDATIONS take shape along with utility connections as construction bond-funded work continues at May Street Elementary, where a new school is being constructed. The current building will be used in the 2018-19 school year, and then demolished.



Expanding bilingual education, an update on construction bond projects, and a report on the expanded lockdown drill at Hood River Valley High School all figure in a diverse agenda at tonight’s Hood River County School District Board meeting.

The session begins at 6 p.m. in the library at HRVHS.

Wenaha Group will update the board on bond projects, in particular the HRVHS and Mid Valley interior and exterior renovations and repairs happening this spring and summer. These include gym siding replacement and re-roofing at the high school and updating the playground and moving the library at Mid Valley.

Hood River County Sheriff’s Department officials will give a report on the May 10 expanded lockdown drill and assembly.

Students and teachers from the Hood River Middle School science department, along with Arts in Education in the Gorge, will present two interactive educational projects, including the “Voices from The Land” project about the Eagle Creek fire, created by teacher Adam Smith’s sixth grade Science Enrichment students.

In addition, fifth and sixth grade students will present examples of digital stories they created to share their placed-based examination of climate change in Oregon, Alaska and Hawaii. Students in each state worked with teaching artists and classroom teachers to study climate science, write their story, design storyboards, paint and utilize the iStopmotion application on iPads to create animated films.

Once completed, the students shared them via Skype to learn more about one another and how climate change is affecting their land, communities and cultural traditions, according to Smith and Shelley Toon Lindberg of Arts in Education.

Kim Yasui, principal at Mid Valley Elementary, and Patricia Cooper, vice principal at Wy’east Middle School, will discuss a proposal to expand bilingual programs at both schools starting in the 2018-19 school year. Changes include two dual-language classrooms at every level, K-5 by 2020, bilingual assemblies, increased access to Spanish reading materials in classroom and in the library, more professional development with a biliteracy focus, and increased coordination between English and Spanish instruction.

At Wy’east, biliteracy efforts include building a stronger Spanish library, bilingual signage around the school, daily announcements in English and Spanish, and teacher training to communicate with Spanish-speaking families.

The bilingual program aims also include more parental involvement, recognition during promotion, and hiring more bilingual staff.



News and information from our partners

Comments

Comments are subject to moderator review and may not appear immediately on the site. A user's first several comments must be manually approved by a moderator.

Please read our commenting policy before posting.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from the News and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)