End of war brings celebration in 1918

November 11, 1938: A giant blast, in which 34 tons of powder were used, Tuesday morning disintegrated a high cliff just west of Viento Park and, incidentally, buried the Union Pacific tracks to a depth of many feet, after pushing these tracks considerably out of line. This was distinctly not according to schedule, for there was only eight hours between trains, and although two big shovels were biting into the rock debris even before the smoke from the powder had lifted, it was obvious that the job would take many more hours than schedule provided.

Hood River News archives
November 11, 1938: A giant blast, in which 34 tons of powder were used, Tuesday morning disintegrated a high cliff just west of Viento Park and, incidentally, buried the Union Pacific tracks to a depth of many feet, after pushing these tracks considerably out of line. This was distinctly not according to schedule, for there was only eight hours between trains, and although two big shovels were biting into the rock debris even before the smoke from the powder had lifted, it was obvious that the job would take many more hours than schedule provided.



1918 — 100 years ago

The people of Hood River, at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon, engaged in an impromptu and spontaneous celebration of the ending of the war. It was arranged for on the spur of the moment, but was none the less hearty and enthusiastic on that account, and everyone who participated in it, which included practically the entire town and many from the outlying districts, was wild with joy and enthusiasm. The people paraded the streets on foot, including men and women, Mayor Dumble, Truman Butler and Charlie Bell, carrying the American flag at the head of the procession, which was followed by citizens in automobiles, the horns of which were all blowing, cowbells were being rung by the occupants of the cars, the mufflers of which were all roaring, and everybody just had a regular good time.

Verbatim: Bids Due Soon On Hiway Work, Say Road Experts

Hood River’s hopes for Highway 35 came a step closer to reality this week as assurance came from the Bureau of Public Roads that bids on the road project will be called for no later than November 15.

Actually, this may be a little later than originally planned. A delay in project planning occurred this month when the bureau decided to extend the new stretch of highway to the vicinity of the Mt. Hood post office.

Final approval of that extension will come from Washington, D.C. Chamber officials say they feel the extension is “virtually certain” to get approval.

Announcing the road news, Chamber Manger George Bartch added:

“Now is the time for countywide planning of the arterial highway that is destined to cross our valley.”

He expressed hope that a road committee would soon begin action in the planning of possible routes for the projected cross-valley highway. The manager asked those interested in such a committee to contact the chamber for further details.

At present, Highway 35 construction is planned to begin at Polallie Creek and extend to the Mt. Hood post office. Many road officials feel it is but a matter of time before authorization will be received to connect the new road with Highway 30, via an express route intersecting this valley.

— Hood River News, November 13, 1958

1928 — 90 years ago

Another honor has fallen to Oregold Ice Cream, made by the Hood River Creamery, again proving that it is the best to be obtained in the Northwest. The winning ice cream was the single sample sent in by the Hood River Creamery, and the victory is the more complete because competitors submitted as many as six different samples in their effort to win the coveted place at the top of the list.

1938 — 80 years ago

Today, the 20th anniversary of the day on which the Armistice was declared on the battlefronts of Europe, all residents of Hood River County will observe, with the Hood River post of the America Legion and its Auxiliary, the Armistice Day celebration which has now assumed the rating of a national holiday. The program will include several features in which the public will join, and three other events confined to members of the Legion and its Auxiliary. For the first time, this year Armistice Day is a national legal holiday by act of congress.

1948 — 70 years ago

Work was underway on the Baldwin-Howell ski tow at Jump Hill on Mount Hood last Sunday, when construction of a tow motor house was started. The tow will be 1,300 feet long and will have a carrying capacity of 40 skiers at a time. It is expected that this big improvement on ski facilities at the north side will attract many more local skiers as well as out-of-towers this coming season.

1958 — 60 years ago

Hood River County pulled in 70.7 percent of its registered voters out to the polls in last week’s general election, reports County Clerk Doreen Imbler. Figures from the clerk’s office list 4,580 votes cast here in the Nov. 4 balloting.

Total registered voters in the county are pegged at 6,473. For the record: The last totals showed 2,971 registered Republicans, 3,337 Democrats and 165 “others” on the clerk’s list.

1968 — 50 years ago

Gene Euwer of Parkdale has been named chairman of a county-wide group of citizens who have begun studying all aspects of the new combined high school. Vice-chairman of the committee, dubbed the Community Involvement Task Force, is Dave McKeown.

Others attending the first meeting of the 15-member group include Marv Harder, Dick Nafsinger, of Hood River; Mrs. Ted Ekker, west side; Rev. Larry Ferguson from the Council of churches; Bob Brown, member at large; and faculty members Jim Porter, Joe Durland and Howard Nellermoe.

1978 — 40 years ago

A nine-hour session Tuesday failed to produce an agreement, and teachers subsequently announced Nov. 28 as a strike date for the Hood River Education Association in case no accord is reached by that date. County School Superintendent Frank Lariza responded that if teachers do go out on strike, he will recommend to the board that the schools remain open.

A project now underway in Odell will soon give the fire department a unique distinction. It will be the only fire department to build and own its own water main. Under construction is a new water main loop that will serve the business area of the community, including Mid Valley School and the Odell Diamond plant.

1988 — 30 years ago

The latest round of public comment on a proposed overpass reconstruction project takes place tomorrow. The Oregon State Department of Transportation, its consulting engineers and local advisory committees propose to upgrade the existing Second State freeway overpass; part of the project would alter traffic flow to the north, serving the port industrial area. Concerns that still need to be addressed included the project’s effect on retail businesses north of the freeway, since altered traffic patters could make these less accessible to motorists.

1998 — 20 years ago

The dots told the story. Last Thursday, the waterfront park panel unveiled to the public its proposed plans for park development on the vacant Parcel 6 on the Hood River waterfront. Participants at the public forum were able to pick their most and least favorite features of the three alternative plans developed by the panel by placing small green (positive) and red (negative) dots on large drawings of the plans. Through the dots, most citizens said the plan with the least amount of commercial building space was their top pick. The process echoed what many have been calling for since the beginning of the planning process — parks and open space should be the focus of Parcel 6.

2008 — 10 years ago

Like traffic itself, one Hood River conversation contained a few horn honks and a couple of near fender-benders as people talked Thursday about May and 13th streets. But the only scrapes were verbal ones, and light at that, though the flow revealed two different directions of thought. State officials sat through a cordial but occasionally testy grilling regarding future safety improvements at 13th and May, one of Hood River’s busiest intersections.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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