Yesteryears: HRMS changes mascots in 1998

October 9, 1958: They Sell Safety — Busy on the fourth phase of the Boy Scouts’ 1958 Safety Good Turn program are these two Eagle scouts, James and John Miller. From them, Mayor Charles Howe receives an advance copy of a valuable “Handbook for Emergencies,” to be distributed door-to-door by all area Scouts on Oct. 11. The booklet is a complete manual for civil defense emergencies. It tells the family what to do and how to prepare for the effects of fires, floods, storm or enemy attack.

Hood River News Archives
October 9, 1958: They Sell Safety — Busy on the fourth phase of the Boy Scouts’ 1958 Safety Good Turn program are these two Eagle scouts, James and John Miller. From them, Mayor Charles Howe receives an advance copy of a valuable “Handbook for Emergencies,” to be distributed door-to-door by all area Scouts on Oct. 11. The booklet is a complete manual for civil defense emergencies. It tells the family what to do and how to prepare for the effects of fires, floods, storm or enemy attack.



1918 — 100 years ago

The trade at home campaign, started by the News last week, meets the approval, apparently, of the merchants and leading businessmen of the city, a few whom have been interviewed on the subject. Herman O. Kresse, Kresse Drug Co.: “The trade at home policy is one that should be pushed in Hood River. It is an excellent move.” R.B. Perigo, Star Grocery: “I think that your trade at home campaign is a mighty fine one. If we could only make everyone see the trade at home policy, it would be a mighty fine thing for Hood River.” E.A. Franz, Franz Hardware Co.: “The trade at home policy is the thing. People should give the local merchants a chance to compete with the mail order houses.”

Verbatim: Hops Fest a hit despite the rain

By ADAM LAPIERRE

News staff writer

Amnesia. Big Horse. Cascade Lakes. These are the ABCs of beer, or at least they were Saturday during the annual Hood River Hops Fest.

With brew names like the Double Dry Hop Diggity, Hoppy Daze, Hoptimus Prime and the Dry-Hopped Knuckle Dragger, it was no mystery as to what the festival the hundreds of rain gear-wearing, mug-carrying and token-toting tasters were attending.

With steady downpours throughout the nine-hour event, the only name missing among the 22 other breweries in attendance was Try to Stay Dry Brewing, which, for obvious reasons, probably doesn’t exist.

Mixed among a hundred-yard row of taps, eager empty mugs and people sandwiched together under large tends to stay out of th rain were three Hood River breweries, all of which served their hoppiest, stomach-tickling recipes.

Big Horse broke out Vernon the Rabbit Slayer and Hometown Easy Blonde.

Full Sail had its Lupulin 1, 2 and 3, all with fresh hops.

Double Mountain served up the Killer Green, Swibrau and its Red Indian Ale.

Eliot Glacier Brewing from Parkdale joined the party with its Vista Ridge Vienna Lager and Barlow Trail Belgian Blonde.

— Hood River News, October 8, 2008

1928 — 90 years ago

Plans for converting Mount Hood and its environs into a national park, making it one of the finest scenic spots in the northwest and ranking with Yellowstone and Yosemite national parks, were announced at a meeting on Friday of last week of a committee from the Multnomah Anglers and Hunting club. Although boundaries of the proposed park would not be the same as those of the existing Mount Hood forest reserve, says the Oregonian, essentially the reserve would take in all the territory around the mountain.

1938 — 80 years ago

This weekend the city of Hood River will be festive on the occasion of the first Harvest Festival it has celebrated in many years. Peace in Europe, an excellent crop of high-grade fruit here and prospects of returns better than the cost of production should all combine to make this festival one that will promote similar events in coming years. Part of State Street, between Second and Third, has been set aside for various amusements, which appeal to both young and old, and various contrivances will furnish all the fun of the fair.

1948 — 70 years ago

Don Hammers has been elected fire chief of the newly-formed West Side Rural Fire District by action of the board of directors at a recent meeting. Mark “Red” Thomas was named assistant chief. Hammers has a broad background in firefighting, having conducted schools on this subject for the cities of San Francisco and Oakland. He has also held important firefighting assignments in the U.S. Navy and is recognized as one of the top men on the West Coast on the subject of firefighting.

1958 — 60 years ago

“In enacting the National Defense Education Act, the 85th congress faced up to the challenge of Soviet intellectual and technical proficiency,” Congressman Al Ulman told members of the Business and Professional Women’s Club in Hood River last week. “Passage of this legislation was that important first step so necessary to meeting the educational crisis facing the nation today.”

1968 — 50 years ago

The joining of Wy’east and Hood River high schools is coming, but not fast enough to suit the annual staff at the two valley schools. So this year for the first time, the two staffs will put out a single yearbook for both schools — for the price of one. The “Aquilla” of Wy’east and the “Dragon” of Hood River will be prepared separately, just as they always have been. But they’ll be bound inside one cover which has been designed by a committee of staff members at both schools.

1978 — 40 years ago

Since June, when the Department of Environmental Quality started pressing for closure of the county sanitary landfill site at Middle Mountain, the county has been looking at solutions to its waste disposal problem. Of the possible alternatives thus far, none of them are inexpensive. And Nov. 1 is the end of a 60-day extension grated the county by DEQ to start closing things down at the landfill location. The first alternative was the hauling of county wastes to the Wasco County sanitary landfill site near The Dalles. The latest potential solution came recently when the county officials started looking into a process that would involve volume reduction of wastes through improved means of incineration.

1988 — 30 years ago

There were some glowing words when the new Dee Forest Products, Inc. brushed the dust off idle hardboard machinery here almost exactly a year ago.

Today, Donald A. Rex can say those predictions were pretty much on target. He should know. Rex is the president and chief executive officer at the Dee plant, and he’s monitored the year of progress since the first boards went through the giant press after it went back into operation. More than that, he has some new projections for the next year that are no less optimistic than the original ones.

1998 — 20 years ago

The times are changing … and so is the Hood River Middle School mascot. Since 1971, the school’s mascot has been the Patriot: A proud soldier dressed in regimental red and white garb. But starting this year, thanks to the participation of each student at HRMS, the school mascot will be the panther, decorated in black and teal.

Although many believed the patriot’s politically questionable gun caused the mascot change, Bob Dais, HRMS principal, quickly disagreed. “We weren’t trying to be non-patriotic,” said Dais. “We just wanted this class of kids to have their own identity. And I’m excited for them. The new uniforms look sharp.”

2008 — 10 years ago

Representatives of the Port of Hood River will meet with members of the Hood River County Planning Commission Oct. 22 to brief them on major provisions in the draft Airport Layout Plan.

The plan affects future design and use of the Ken Jernstedt Airfield south of Hood River. Probably the most significant proposal in the plan involves shift in the main runway 550 feet to the east. The Airport Layout Plan also addresses the airport’s operations and longevity, according to Scott Keillor of Columbia Planning and Design LLC. The port has hired Keillor to head up the planning effort.

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



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