Yesteryears: Lost Lake Road closes for winter in 1938

October 24, 1968: Changing hands at Hood River last week was Mount Hood Railroad, which has served Hood River Valley for well over 50 years. George H. Baker, left, general manager of Union Pacific, accepts the deed from A.C. Lighthall, who sold the railroad to UP. Shortline has been property of the Lighthall family since 1936. Baker became president of the new member of the UP family, which was renamed Mount Hood Railway.

Hood River News archives
October 24, 1968: Changing hands at Hood River last week was Mount Hood Railroad, which has served Hood River Valley for well over 50 years. George H. Baker, left, general manager of Union Pacific, accepts the deed from A.C. Lighthall, who sold the railroad to UP. Shortline has been property of the Lighthall family since 1936. Baker became president of the new member of the UP family, which was renamed Mount Hood Railway.



1918 — 100 years ago

The schools of Hood River will close this evening (Tuesday) as a precautionary measure to prevent the spread of Spanish influenza. This was decided on Monday afternoon by Mayor Dumble, under authority vested in him by the State Board of Health, after consultation with Professor Gibson, superintendent of schools, and President E.O. Blanchar, of the local school board.

Mayor Dumble asks the newspapers to state very emphatically that the school children must be kept at home, and if they are not, they will be subject to police control, which he will order invoked. It is absolutely necessary, says Mayor Dumble, to prevent the spread of influenza that the children be retained, and he is very much in earnest about this matter.

Verbatim: PROD notes milestone; 100th dog adopted

PROD — Promoting Responsible Ownership of Dogs — recently arranged for the adoption of its 100th dog.

Jellybean, aka Sadie, a 5-month-old black Labrador mix, was adopted by Larry and Lindee Wolf of Dufur.

The happy canine joined Dakota, a 10-month-old Bernese Mountain mix, on the Wolf’s 75-acre ranch. Dakota was PROD’s 99th dog adoption.

Sadie was found huddling near a fruit bin in Hood River and responded well to PROD’s pet care program, according to Cleo Sterling.

Dakota, on the other hand, was simply abandoned and the dog was turned over to PROD.

“We are especially pleased with the number of community members who have chosen to adopt their pets from us in an effort to support our pet care program,” added Sterling.

— Hood River News, October 21, 1998

1928 — 90 years ago

Throughout the night of Tuesday, Nov. 6, election returns will be given out to patrons of the Rialto Theater. Through the cooperation of Gibbs Battery Station and A.S. Kolstad, four power amplifiers of the most modern type have been ordered from the east and are expected to be here in a few days, when they will be installed in the theater. The Rialto will be open all night and will be kept warm and comfortable for patrons who attend the evening show.

This service is being arranged to give all an opportunity to keep posted on the election returns both national and state as fast as they are transmitted over the air by radio.

1938 — 80 years ago

With the closing of the gate at the Forest boundary on Lost Lake Road Monday, visitors to the lake during the winter season will have to travel from the boundary on foot. The road has been closed in order to permit the Forest Service crew to prepare the road for the coming winter, so that it may be in the best possible condition this coming spring, when the road crew goes over the road just before opening.

1948 — 70 years ago

While the picking situation in Hood River Valley did not seem as critical this week as it did last week, many growers were still searching for capable workers to harvest their fruit. Continuing good weather aided in speeding up the harvest. Blue skies have prevailed throughout the past 10 days or more and the valley has enjoyed a real taste of Indian summer.

One depressing note for valley growers was the unusually heavy drop of Newtowns.

1958 — 60 years ago

A change in the Hood River business scene this week is the purchase of field Furniture Company by the Hampton Furniture Company of The Dalles. Herb Field has operated th business in downtown Hood River the past 14 years.

Mr. Field plans to retire. Ron VanMeter, formerly with Healey’s The Dalles Furniture Company, will be the new manager.

1968 — 50 years ago

Landscaping plans for the Port of Hood River’s industrial park esplanade went to the city for approval here Monday. The port organization will pay for the landscaping before turning the street (the north extension of Second) over to the city for maintenance. The broad street on port property has islands in the middle, where plantings have been planted. Port officials also include plans for street illuminations and poles in the center islands, along with trees and shrubs.

1978 — 40 years ago

A major change in organization of one county department has been submitted by the county’s employee advisory committee and it has been referred to the former head of that department for recommendation.

The County Board of Commissioners received the request this week to consider dividing the Department of Records and Assessment into a Department of Records and Elections, and a Department of Assessments.

1988 — 30 years ago

Approximately 1,000 acres would be annexed to the City of Cascade Locks under a proposal appearing on ballots in that area Nov. 8. The area in question lies east of the city limits, following the meandering line of the Columbia River to the north, extending to the east edge of Government Rock on the east, both sides of I-84 on the south, and the existing city limits on the west. Although the city council held a public hearing on the proposal, the council itself has not and cannot legally take a stand either for or against the annexation issue. Only people living in the area to be annexed will be asked to vote on the measure, since the public hearing already garnered general comments.

1998 — 20 years ago

A number of firearms won’t find their way back into the hands of youngsters and criminals — or anyone else — thanks to a blow torch and machine press. The Hood River County Sheriff’s Department utilized equipment at the county public works shop Thursday to destroy a number of handguns, rifles and shotguns, as well as knives and drug paraphernalia and other assorted items. The firearms, among the many the department confiscates each year, were squashed in a press or cut apart with a torch to make sure they do not make their way back into the streets, according to Sheriff Joe Wampler.

2008 — 10 years ago

The 2008 harvest is over at Moore Orchards in Pine Grove and thousands of boxes of pears and apples now await shipment to foreign and domestic markets. Jose Martinez, foreman at the 400-acre farm, is proud of the towering stacks that fill a cavernous warehouse. He has experienced the same sense of satisfaction during every successful growing cycle during the past 36 years. “You can always see how hard everyone worked all year long after harvest. It’s fabulous,” said Martinez, 52. “When everything’s done, I feel relieved — I feel great.”

Compiled by Trisha Walker, News staff writer



News and information from our partners

Comments

Comments are subject to moderator review and may not appear immediately on the site. A user's first several comments must be manually approved by a moderator.

Please read our commenting policy before posting.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from the News and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)