‘Walkshop’ guide Dan Burden meets with Council Monday

Consultant Dan Burden, center in back, at Hood River Armory on June 6 with the Walkshop advisory group, from left in back: Heather Staten, Cindy Walbridge, Peter Cornelison, and Kathy Fitzgerald. In front, Megan Ramey and Jody Ready.

Submitted photo
Consultant Dan Burden, center in back, at Hood River Armory on June 6 with the Walkshop advisory group, from left in back: Heather Staten, Cindy Walbridge, Peter Cornelison, and Kathy Fitzgerald. In front, Megan Ramey and Jody Ready.



Dan Burden, a nationally-recognized pedestrian and bicycling access consultant, will appear before Hood River City Council Monday to answer questions about the spring 2018 “Walkshop” study done on Hood River Heights.

City Council meets at 6 p.m. at City Hall, Second and State streets.

Burden was hired in June to lead a day-long tour and discussion of access and safety issues on the Heights, in a program funded by Oregon Community Foundation, Hood River Valley Residents Committee and the City of Hood River.

The outcome was a review of walkability and livability issues, and identification of ways to strengthen Heights’ infrastructure and to develop an action plan. That plan was presented to Council in August.

City residents, city engineering and planning officials, council members, business owners and others gathered on June 6 for the Walkshop, which started at Hood River Fire Station.

Key recommendations are:

*Reducing speeds on 12th and 13th from 25 to 20 miles per hour.

*Adding curb extensions on 12th, 13th and May streets in identified areas.

*Add new on-street parking on wider side streets.

*Upgrades to the alley behind 12th Street.

*Extensive sidewalk repair on 12th and 13th streets.

*Study intersections from 12 and 13th streets and May Street for roundabouts.

*Add gateway features on 12th and 13th.

*Return to two-way streets, or convert to a single lane and add other features such as parking and bike lanes.

(Twelfth and 13th were two-way streets until the city created the one-way grid in the mid-1980s.)

Recommendations by Burden included changes in pedestrian crossings, improved signage, increased bicycle routes including protected bike lanes, wider and redesigned sidewalks, speed reduction and traffic calming measures.

The Burden study will be used in the ongoing process of deciding how to spend Urban Renewal District funds on the Heights, where the city has identified pedestrian and bicycle safety as a high priority. However, no decisions have been made on any potential traffic or infrastructure changes on the Heights.



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