1910 — 110 years ago

A new church, Asbury Methodist, will be erected facing State Street and will be 45x60 feet. Under it, there will be a basement equipped with kitchen, dining room and a gymnasium and reading room for the young people. The front will be half stone veneer with half timbered gables. At the southwest corner an entrance will be provided and another at the side. The old building will be divided from the new structure by a big roll curtain which can be rolled back, throwing the two into one. The combined seating capacity will be 800.

Miss Pearl Isenberg, daughter of M.P. Isenberg, closed her school Friday at Wamic, giving her pupils a picnic in the grove below town.

1920 — 100 years ago

The third annual report issued by the State Fire Marshal and covering the year ending March 31, 1920, contains details of the fires in this county during the year, together with the loss entailed. There were 37 outbreaks in properties collectively insured at $716,501.22. Overheated or defective chimneys, flues, pipes or stacks caused seven fires; overheated or defective stoves, heaters, boilers and their pipes, one; rubbish and sparks, 16; matches and careless smokers, 1; hot ashes, grease, tar or metal, four.

1930 — 90 years ago

Mount Adams was climbed for the first time this year when, last Sunday, A. L. Anderson led a party of five to the summit.

After a number of delays, the big lattice radio aerial, which has been lying on the roof of the Bartol Motor Co. for the past couple of weeks, was successfully elevated yesterday morning and now looms up like a dirigible mooring mast.

1940 — 80 years ago

All who are interested in these United States staying out of the latest war in Europe are invited to attend a meeting to be held at the Asbury M. E. Church at 8 p.m., on Thursday, June 27, when J. J. Handsaker, the well-known advocate of peace, will give an address on “Is War Inevitable?”

1950 — 70 years ago

A final decision on the proposed hardboard plant for utilization of lumber waste products at Oregon Lumber company was reached this week and the Dee mill is assured of a $2,000,000 addition. The new hardboard plant, which will employ 75 men, is expected to be in operation by Jan. 1, 1951.

1960 — 60 years ago

A delegation of Hood River merchants, aided and abetted by city councilman Bill Runkel, pushed, shoved, tugged and finally moved the common council of this city into fulfillment of a threat they had made two months ago against the owner of a ramschackle, abandoned building in downtown Hood River. In the process, councilman Runckel exchanged sharp words with Mayor Ken Jernstedt.

1970 — 50 years ago

Some 300 persons gathered in the park-like surroundings of the new Clear Lake dam and reservoir to dedicate the facility last Saturday. The reservoir draws its name, Laurance Lake, from the late Sheldon Laurance, former chairman of the Middle Fork Irrigation District board. He was instrumental in bringing the project to construction but died of an illness before it was completed.

Heaviest volume of air shipments of fresh cherries by far ever consigned from the Stadelman fruit processing plant here is moving to metropolitan eastern markets and to London, with a few 80,000 pound consignments by chartered planes.

1980 — 40 years ago

The Port of Klickitat broke ground Monday afternoon for its previously announced project to construct a building to house an aluminum recovery plant in Dallesport.

1990 — 50 years ago

About $10,000 was spent in Wasco County Republican primary races, recently filed campaign expenditure statements indicate.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s decision Friday to list the Northern spotted owl as a threatened species prompted Northwest lawmakers to both criticize the decision and call for steps to east the blow to Northwest communities.

2000 — 20 years ago

Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital will buy the Care Corner facility at 1151 May St., in an agreement reached this week with Mid Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles.

2010 — 10 years ago

For the third time this year, Wasco County has given its blessing to a newly restructured rural emergency services plan — this one in Tygh Valley.

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